salivary gland

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Related to Salivary gland diseases: salivary gland cancer, Stomach diseases

sal·i·var·y gland

[TA]
any of the saliva-secreting exocrine glands of the oral cavity.
See also: major salivary glands, minor salivary glands.
Synonym(s): glandula salivaria [TA]

salivary gland

n.
A gland that secretes saliva, especially any of three pairs of glands, the parotid, submaxillary, and sublingual, that discharge secretions into the oral cavity of humans and most other mammals.

sal·i·var·y gland

(sal'i-var-ē gland) [TA]
Any of the saliva-secreting exocrine glands of the oral cavity.
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SALIVARY GLANDS

salivary gland

Any of the glands near the oral cavity that secrete saliva. The major glands are paired and include the parotid, the sublingual, and the submandibular. There are numerous minor salivary glands in the oral cavity, named according to their locations: lingual, sublingual, palatal, buccal, labial, and glossopharyngeal. See: illustration

Salivary secretion is under nervous control, reflexly initiated by mechanical, chemical, or radiant stimuli acting on taste buds in the mouth, olfactory receptors, or the eyes. Secretion may also be due to conditioned reflexes as when one thinks about food or hears a dinner bell. The nerve supply of the salivary glands is from the facial and glossopharyngeal nerves, which increase secretion, and from the sympathetic nerves, which decrease secretion. The blood supply is from branches of the external carotid artery.

See also: gland

salivary gland

any gland that secretes SALIVA.

Salivary gland

Three pairs of glands that secrete into the mouth and aid digestion.
Mentioned in: Dry Mouth, Parotidectomy

sal·i·var·y gland

(sal'i-var-ē gland) [TA]
Any of the saliva-secreting exocrine glands of oral cavity.
See also: major salivary glands, minor salivary glands
References in periodicals archive ?
Sialendoscopy is a minimally invasive approach with a low rate of complications for the diagnosis and the treatment of obstructive salivary gland diseases (5, 7, 8).
Our study especially aimed to focus on and report the long-term outcomes of a specific group other than all patients with obstructive salivary gland disease who were treated by sialendoscopy.
It should be a valuable addition to the library of anyone interested in salivary gland disease.
RESULTS: The salivary gland diseases were seen in all age groups.
CONCLUSION: The present study concluded that high resolution sonography, along with color Doppler sonography should be used as first line imaging modality in evaluation of salivary gland diseases. In acute inflammation, sonography helps to confirm or rule out abscesses or sialolithiasis.
Salivary gland diseases are divided on the basis of being benign or malignant.
Salivary gland disease in dogs and cats: 245 cases (1985-1988).
has introduced a suite of salivary duct access products that offer minimally invasive options for the treatment of obstructive salivary gland disease. Minimally invasive treatment of obstructive salivary gland disease can reduce the need for invasive open surgery, according to an article published in a German medical journal last year.
Initially, Cook Medical OHNS will focus on products that are used to treat salivary gland disease, chronic sinusitis, vocal cord paralysis and obstructive sleep apnea, as well as products used for soft-tissue repair and in interventional airway and esophageal procedures.

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