salivary

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Related to Salivary ducts: Salivary glands, Salivary duct stone, Wharton duct

salivary

 [sal´ĭ-ver-e]
pertaining to the saliva.
salivary glands the glands in the mouth that secrete saliva. The major ones are the three pairs known as the parotid, submaxillary, and sublingual glands (see Plates); there are other smaller salivary glands within the cheeks and tongue. The largest are the parotids, located below and in front of each ear. Saliva secreted by these glands is discharged into the mouth through openings in the cheeks on each side opposite the upper teeth. The submaxillary glands, located inside the lower jaw, discharge saliva upward through openings into the floor of the mouth. The sublingual glands, beneath the tongue, also discharge saliva into the floor of the mouth.



The saliva is needed to moisten the mouth, lubricate food for easier swallowing, remineralize the tooth surface, and provide the enzyme (ptyalin) necessary to begin food breakdown in the preliminary stage of digestion. The salivary glands produce about 1.5 liters of saliva daily.

The salivary glands are controlled by the nervous system. Normally they respond by producing saliva within 2 or 3 seconds after being stimulated by the sight, smell, or taste of food. This quick response is a reflex action.

In mumps (parotitis), the parotids become inflamed and swollen. Occasionally, salivary glands produce too much saliva; this condition is called ptyalism, and is the result of local irritation from dental appliances or of disturbances of digestion or of the nervous system or other causes. Certain diseases, drugs such as morphine or atropine, and nutritional deficiency of vitamin B can result in decreased secretion of saliva.
The salivary glands. From Jarvis, 2000.
salivary gland inclusion disease cytomegalic inclusion disease.

sal·i·var·y

(sal'i-vār'ē),
Relating to saliva.
Synonym(s): sialic, sialine
[L. salivarius]

salivary

(săl′ə-vĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or producing saliva.
2. Of or relating to a salivary gland.

salivary

adjective Relating to the saliva or salivary gland.

sal·i·var·y

(sal'i-var-ē)
Relating to saliva.
Synonym(s): sialic, sialine.
[L. salivarius]

sal·i·var·y

(sal'i-var-ē)
Relating to saliva.
Synonym(s): sialic, sialine.
[L. salivarius]
References in periodicals archive ?
If the chitin wall around salivary ducts can be fortified, infections may be thwarted.
Nevertheless, aetiological factors may be related to the salivary content [2, 5], including other factors such as trauma to salivary duct or gland and precipitation of salts linked to certain organic substances.
The controlled inflation of the balloon dilates strictures in the affected salivary ducts.
A blocked salivary duct is liable to become infected, causing the swelling to become red and inflamed, with possible leakage of pus into the mouth.
The ultrasound imaging of the salivary gland showed its enlargement, inhomogeneous parenchymal echostructure, with multiple tiny, oval, hypoechoic areas corresponding to the foci of lymphocytic infiltration and dilated salivary ducts. Ultrasound-controlled FNAB was performed, obtaining a smear rich in mononuclear cells and patches of epithelial cells.
Physicians use these products in sialendoscopy, a minimally invasive procedure for visualizing and treating obstructive salivary gland disorders through the salivary ducts. Sialendoscopy can be performed in the physician's office in an outpatient procedure and has been shown to reduce the risks of facial nerve paralysis and morbidity.
Dilated salivary ducts can also be observed in ultrasonographic images, as identified in this case report, which can be filled with a purulent content in cases of suppurative sialadenitis.
The typical symptoms of salivary lithiasis are pain and swelling due to obstruction of the salivary ducts, classically at mealtimes.
* Salivary flow around the maxillary anterior teeth is notoriously low and slow because of gravity and the location of the salivary ducts.
Although large sialoliths have been reported both in salivary glands and in salivary ducts, stones larger than 3 cm are rare.8,13,14 The giant siaolith in this patient was completely encased in the duct of the submandibular gland.
Sympathetic stimulation promotes saliva flow through muscle contractions at salivary ducts. In this regard both parasympathetic and sympathetic stimuli result in an increase in salivary gland secretions.
Cell lysis at the salivary ducts, gingival pockets, or the oral epithelium can lead to the release of RNA into the saliva.