salamander

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salamander

(săl′ə-măn′dər)
n.
1. Any of various small, tailed amphibians of the order Caudata, having porous scaleless skin and usually two pairs of limbs of equal size, found chiefly in northern temperate regions.
2. A portable stove used to heat or dry buildings under construction.

sal′a·man′drine (-drĭn) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic variability among 5 endangered Chinese giant salamanders, Andrias davidianus.
Nesting females are concentrated in specific habitat niches, and are thus the easiest four-toed salamanders to find.
2015) as follows: Domusnovas (cave and surroundings), 42 salamanders, of which 11 were females and 31 males; Nuxis (two caves), 24 salamanders, of which 8 were females and 16 males; and Fluminimaggiore (three caves), 31 salamanders, of which all were males.
"They're definitely unique: often referred to as living fossils, Chinese giant salamanders have remained largely unchanged for millions of years - as the only zoo in the country to have one in residence it's a real privilege to be able to introduce the species to our visitors."
This range overlap, when combined with similar habitat preferences between many salamanders and opossums (moist woodland), leads to the potential for extensive interaction between these species.
Descriptions of animal size at hatching are sparse for torrent salamanders. However, our sole captive-reared hatchling was similar in size to the few other reports for Rhyacotriton.
Aside from its identifiable leopard spots and eel body, the giant salamander also has two forelegs, no back legs and a set of gills located at the back of its head.
"We do find Jemez Mountains salamanders in mosaic burns like the Thompson Ridge Fire," Cordova says, "but I have not spent enough time searching in severely burned areas of the Las Conchas Fire because the sporadic monsoon season dictates when and where to survey.
The salamanders once thrived in Lake Patzcuaro, Mexico's third largest lake, but are now listed as critically endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).
They also matched up two studies from 2013 to 2016 to show that although the salamanders had once roamed across China, now their numbers are dwindling.
Steve said: "We don't get many calls at all about salamanders so I was very surprised to look in the box and see a bright orange and black fire salamander.