masochism

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masochism

 [mas´o-kizm]
the act or instance of gaining pleasure experiencing physical or psychological pain. The term is usually used to denote sexual m. adj., adj masochis´tic.
sexual masochism a paraphilia in which sexual gratification is derived from being hurt, humiliated, or otherwise made to suffer physically or psychologically.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mas·och·ism

(mas'ō-kizm, maz'ō-),
1. Passive algolagnia; a form of perversion, often sexual in nature, in which a person experiences pleasure in being abused, humiliated, or maltreated. Compare: sadism.
2. A general orientation in life that personal suffering relieves guilt and leads to a reward.
[Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Austro-Hungarian novelist, 1836-1895]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

masochism

(măs′ə-kĭz′əm)
n.
1. The deriving of sexual gratification from fantasies or acts that involve being made to suffer physical or mental pain. Also called sexual masochism.
2. The deriving of pleasure from being humiliated or mistreated, either by another or by oneself.
3. A willingness or tendency to subject oneself to unpleasant or trying experiences.

mas′och·ist n.
mas′och·is′tic adj.
mas′och·is′ti·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Psychology Moral masochism A pattern of behaviour in which a person craves abuse and exploitation by others, possibly linked to unresolved childhood conflicts and a low self-esteem
Sexology Pleasure derived from physical or psychological pain inflicted on one’s self either by one’s self or by others. It is termed sexual masochism and classified as a paraphilia when it is consciously sought as a central part of one’s sexuoerotic scripts, acts or fantasies, or as a prerequisite to sexual arousal or gratification. In sexual masochism, the masochist is the recipient of abuse, torture, punishment, discipline, humiliation, and servitude; it is the opposite of sadism; both may coexist in the same person
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

masochism

Psychiatry A paraphilia/sexual deviancy in which there is a need–or preference for humiliation, physical abuse, or other form of suffering in order to achieve sexual arousal or orgasm. Cf Paraphilia, Sadism Psychology Moral masochism A pattern of behavior in which a person tolerates abuse and exploitation by others, possibly linked to unresolved childhood conflicts and a low self-esteem. See Self-esteem.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mas·och·ism

(mas'ŏ-kizm)
1. Passive algolagnia; a form of perversion, often sexual in nature, in which a person experiences pleasure in being abused, humiliated, or maltreated.
Compare: sadism
2. A general orientation in life that personal suffering relieves guilt and leads to a reward.
[Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, Austro-Hungarian novelist, 1836-1895]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

masochism

The achievement of sexual arousal or gratification by the experience of physical or mental pain or humiliation. Masochism is said to derive from a partly repressed sense of guilt which inhibits orgasm but which can be assuaged by punishment so that orgasm becomes possible. (Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, 1835–95, Austrian pornographic novelist).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Masochism

Sexual arousal by having pain and/or humiliation inflicted upon oneself.
Mentioned in: Sexual Perversions
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sacher-Masoch,

Leopold von, Austrian attorney and writer, 1836-1895.
masochism - a form of perversion in which a person experiences pleasure in being abused, humiliated, or mistreated.
masochist - the passive party in the practice of masochism.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A series of questions arises at this point concerning the possibility of discussing sadism and masochism in a way that would not conflate fiction and reality.
Sadism and masochism are, of course, named after famous practitioners--the Marquis de Sade (1740-1824) and Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (1835-1895)--who stand approximately one hundred years apart, but well within the Foucauldian dates of deployment.
This path can be demonstrated by tracing two separate but linked processes: the first being the rehabilitation of the Marquis de Sade within intellectual texts; the second being, the psychoanalytic naturalisation of a specific type of (heterosexual) sadism and masochism.
If Sade has been re-invented in intellectual life from aristocratic degenerate into the essence of prophetic masculinity this has been done against a cultural background that continues to normalise--even at the very moment it pathologises--the practice of sadism and masochism. Freudian psychoanalysis returns to the beating drama of heterosex, previously canvassed by Ellis and Krafft-Ebbing, in the concept of the primal scene: for Freud the child witnesses the scene as 'some sort of ill-treatment or act of subjugation: they view it, that is, in a sadistic sense'.
The apparent heterosexism of sadism and masochism reached a rather dramatic climax in a now famous conference entitled 'Feminism, Sexuality and Power' that took place in the United States in 1980.
Both heterosexual women and lesbian S/Mers had been accused of a similar state of bad faith: the belief was simply that both buy into a system that perpetuates sadism and masochism in its gendered alignment.
Wilson's narrative seems to push for a careful deconstruction of what I have termed the heterosexualisation of sadism and masochism, or the beater and the beaten.
Both clinic workers suggested reading the book 50 Shades of Grey, stating that it is "anti feminine" and "male-controlling." The book they said was an "eye opening resource" to engage in BDSM or "bondage and discipline, sadism and masochism."
Peer Rope Cambridge, a group that supports the bondage, discipline, domination, submission, sadism and masochism (BDSM), published the agenda for the 12 October event and said the venue would be announced at a later date.