saddle nose

(redirected from Saddle-nose)

sad·dle nose

a nose with markedly depressed bridge, seen in congenital syphilis, after injury from trauma or operation, or after infection of the nasal septum.

saddle nose

Etymology: AS, sadol + nosu
a sunken nasal bridge caused by injury or disease and resulting in damage to the nasal septum. Also called saddleback nose.
A nose characterised by a marked depression of the root, classically described as a late manifestation of congenital syphilis-induced rhinitis and frontal periostitis, which destroys adjacent bone, cartilage and, occasionally, the nasal septum
DiffDx The saddle nose deformity has also been described in AIDS embryopathy, Christ-Siemans-Touraine syndrome, various deletion syndromes, fetal trimethadione syndrome, Laron-type dwarfism, leprechaunism, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, type III, OSMED syndrome, relapsing polychondritis, thanatophoric dwarfism, Wegener’s granulomatosis, and various conditions that are further characterised by gargoyle-like facies

sad·dle nose

(sad'ĕl nōz)
A nose with markedly depressed bridge, seen in congenital syphilis or after injury from trauma or operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
gov/pubmed/24817241) saddle-nose ", where the bridge of the nose collapses.
saddle-nose deformity and an S-shaped deformity), and septal fracture, which is often not diagnosed.
Regarding the new classification, the upper airway involvement includes recurrent epistaxis, nasal crusting, nasal septum perforation, saddle-nose deformity, and chronic or recurrent sinus inflammation [5,6].
Other symptoms include nasal membrane ulcerations and crusting, saddle-nose deformity, inflammation of the ear with hearing problems, inflammation of the eye with sight problems, cough (with or without the presence of blood), pleuritis, (inflammation of the lining of the lung), rash and/or skin sores, fever, lethargy weakness, loss of appetite, weight loss, arthritic joint pain, night sweats, and haematuria which may or may not be indicated by a change in urine colour.
In the nasal cavity group, the only long-term complications were sleep apnea and saddle-nose deformity, which occurred in 1 patient each (14%).
Saddle-nose deformity can occur as a result of trauma to the nose, but it has also been well described in the setting of infections such as leprosy and syphilis and idiopathic inflammatory conditions such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener granulomatosis) and relapsing polychondritis.
After drainage, examination of the nasal septum showed complete loss of all septal cartilage support, resulting in a severe saddle-nose deformity (figure 3).
One patient had an early loss of septal cartilage and nasal support, which developed into a crooked and saddle-nose deformity requiring reconstruction 7 months later.
In addition, a large septal perforation without saddle-nose deformity was noted.
The swinging-door technique violates the principle of maintaining an intact L strut, but it does not create saddle-nose deformities.
A 73-year-old woman with a history of Wegener's granulomatosis presented with a saddle-nose deformity (figure 1).
In rare cases of untreated advanced disease, a saddle-nose deformity may occur.