sacrotuberous ligament

(redirected from Sacrotuberous ligaments)

sa·cro·tu·ber·ous lig·a·ment

[TA]
the ligament that passes from the ischial tuberosity to the ilium, sacrum, and coccyx, transforming the sciatic notch to a large sciatic foramen, which is then further subdivided by the sacrospinous ligament.

sa·cro·tu·ber·ous lig·a·ment

(sā'krō-tū'bĕr-ŭs lig'ă-mĕnt) [TA]
The ligament that passes from the ischial tuberosity to the ilium, sacrum, and coccyx, transforming the sciatic notch to a large sciatic foramen, which is then further subdivided by the sacrospinous ligament.

sacrotuberous ligament

The ligament extending from the tuberosity of the ischium to the posterior superior and inferior iliac spines and to the lower part of the sacrum and coccyx.
See also: ligament

sacrotuberous ligament

see Table 12.
References in periodicals archive ?
A recently described alternative open technique consists of a transgluteal approach, which allows access to the pudendal nerve between the sacrospinous and the sacrotuberous ligaments (Fig.
The iliolumbar ligament is one of three vertebral-pelvic ligaments responsible for stabilizing the lumbrosacral spine in the pelvis, along with the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments.
The nerve runs between the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments, for instance, and entrapment between these two ligaments is probably the most common cause of pudendal neuralgia.
In our practice, we most often find the nerve entrapped between the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments, which form a sort of "V" in the pelvis.
The main concern with this approach since it was originally described by Professor Roger Robert in Nantes, France, has been the required transection of the sacrotuberous ligament and the possible impact on stability of the sacroiliac joint.
An incision of approximately 7-10 cm in length is made across the gluteal region overlying the sacrotuberous ligament.
In some patients, the pudendal nerve may actually be attached to the anterior surface of the sacrotuberous ligament.
The sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments of the pelvic floor also play a role in resisting external rotation and VS forces.
The stability of the pelvic ring is determined by the integrity of the posterior weightbearing sacroiliac complex, which includes the sacroiliac (posterior and anterior), sacrospinous, and sacrotuberous ligaments.
The sides are created by the right and left pubic arch and the sacrotuberous ligaments (Figure 2).
Posteriorly the ischiorectal fossae extends below the lower edge of gluteus maximus as far as the sacrotuberous ligament (Figure 4).