sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul, who said he had poured out his life like a libation, a sacrificial offering. Am I having trouble praying?
She not only fails to accomplish the task but also becomes the sacrificial offering (the dragon) for the story's hero.
Whatever, what kind of mind could come up with the song title This Is How You Spell "Hahaha, We Destroyed The Hopes And Dreams Of A Generation Of Faux-Romantics." In short, expect the unexpected because that's whay you get from this vivid, witty and often ferocious sacrificial offering on the altar of originality in an oh-too-often dour pop world.
That adds up to the sacrificial offering of three major wickets in the last few minutes before two intervals at the end of good sessions for England.
The temple is needed not for the atonement of guilt (5:5 Why should the Deity become angry over your speech?) but for the cultivation and transmission of religious traditions (4:17 draw near in order to hear and not in order to make a sacrificial offering).
We know what you're saying Peter, and you did performas the sacrificial offering up front, working alone after Wayne Rooney's dismissal.
(That of Iphigeneia is perhaps the best known.) This could have been connected to the "spotless" sacrificial offering reported in the Hebrew Scriptures as offering the hope of salvation (126).
In Genesis 22:1-14, God tests Abraham by asking him to kill his son Isaac on the mountain as a sacrificial offering. Then grace prevails over law, life over death.
It seems that once a year, the dragon (Paul Murphy) takes a winsome village maiden as a sacrificial offering. Harnick's dry asides find the hero, who just happens to be named Lancelot, admitting to being a distant cousin of the celebrated Camelot jouster.
Occasionally, a surfer was tossed forward and dumped just in front of the stage, apparently as a sacrificial offering to the Floater god.
Levinson says he first experienced the hold rituals can have over people when, as a child during the High Holy Days, his Orthodox grandmother took him to a Manhattan bridge, held out a handkerchief and symbolically emptied it into the water as a sacrificial offering of atonement.
A sacrificial offering that is entirely consumed by flames.