SUMO1

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SUMO1

A gene on chromosome 2q33 that encodes a ubiquitin-like protein, which can be covalently attached to proteins as a monomer or a lysine-linked polymer. This post-translational modification on lysine residues of protein (sumolyation) plays a crucial role in a number of cellular processes, including nuclear transport, DNA replication and repair, mitosis and signal transduction. SUMO1 may also regulate a network of genes involved in palate development. It interacts with CHD3, EXOSC9, HIF1A, HIPK2, HIPK3, PARK2, PIAS1, PIAS2,  RAD51, RAD52, RANBP2, SAE2, UBE2I and USP25.
 
Molecular pathology
Defects in SUMO1 cause non-syndromic orofacial cleft type 10.
References in periodicals archive ?
The research from the Cardiovascular Research Center at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is the final study phase before human clinical trials can begin testing SUMO-1 gene therapy.
In large animal models of heart failure, the researchers found that gene therapy delivery of high dose SUMO-1 alone, as well as SUMO-1 and SERCA2 together, result in stronger heart contractions, better blood flow, and reduced heart volumes, compared to just SERCA2 gene therapy alone.
The nuclear bodies contain, in addition to PML (in normal individuals), several important regulatory proteins including SUMO-1 (see next page), CREB-binding protein, retinoblastoma-susceptibility gene product (pRB), the death-domain-associated protein (Daxx), and p53.
SUMO-1 is linked to the target protein as a monomer (SUMO-2 and -3 are capable of forming polymers).
Morris, a cell biologist and pharmacologist at the Population Council's Center for Biomedical Research, suggests that a protein known as SUMO-1 is involved in numerous aspects of this process.
SUMO--which comes in two varieties, SUMO-1 and SUMO-2/3--is a small protein that attaches to other proteins in a process known as SUMOylation.
In both humans and rodents, we followed the presence of SUMO-1 and sumoylated proteins during spermatogenesis, from the early proliferating germ cell to the mature sperm," says Morris.
For the first time, this study provides compelling support that in both humans and rodents, the regulation of spermatogenesis may be mediated by interactions between SUMO-1 and a molecule known as the androgen receptor.
SUMO-1 appears to be more abundant in the mouse sex body than in that of the human.
Differences are also found in rodent and human SUMO-1 during meiosis--the type of cell division that results in sperm and eggs.