SSRIs


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SSRIs

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, a class of medication used to treat depression.
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selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

; SSRIs class of major antidepressant drugs, better tolerated and with fewer side-effects than monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs); SSRIs antagonize ropivacaine metabolism (i.e. increase risk of ropivacaine toxicity); e.g. fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Seroxat)
References in periodicals archive ?
Lucian Medrihan, a research associate in the lab of neuroscientist and Nobel laureate Paul Greengard who led the study, said: "While existing SSRIs can produce moderate effects within hours or even minutes, most people don't really begin to feel better until they've been on the drugs for a significant amount of time-a major drawback when it comes to treating clinical depression.
Andre Sourander, co-author of the study, added: Further studies should determine whether the developing fetus is particularly sensitive to the effects of SSRIs in different trimesters, whether some medications may be safer than others for the fetus, and whether evidence-based psychotherapies could be better utilized to maximize maternal benefits while minimizing risk to the long-term health of the developing fetus.
A 2014 systematic review and meta-analysis of 19 case-control and cohort studies with a total of 446,949 patients investigated the risk of UGI bleeding in patients using SSRIs and NSAIDs.
There have been several reports in the literature that suggest there are modest effects on motor function in children whose mothers used SSRIs during pregnancy, but these reports have not been particularly systematic and have excluded some relevant variables, such as the presence or absence of a psychiatric disorder during pregnancy.
In an initial analysis, autism was strongly associated with maternal psychiatric diagnoses and with the use of drugs other than SSRIs during pregnancy.
Because maternal depression itself carries risks for the fetus, the benefits of prenatal SSRI use should be carefully weighed against potential harm.
Conclusion: Depression is frequently associated with antiviral therapy of HCV RNA viraemia with interferon and SSRIs have proved an effective and safe remedy in these patients.
To address the question of whether these factors may have accounted for the differences in outcomes, they retrospectively matched patients who had taken SSRIs with patients who were not taking the drugs.
There's also "very good evidence" that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) helps anxiety, too, though it might be a bit slower than SSRIs.
PPI-related SSRI elevations were 5 to 20 percent less frequent in men than in women.
As the risk in association with treatment in late pregnancy seems to be more than doubled, we recommend caution when treating pregnant women with SSRis.
There's a general feeling that the SSRIs are safer," the study's lead investigator, Carol Coupland, Ph.