SRY gene


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Related to SRY gene: Swyer syndrome, SOX9

SRY gene

(ĕs′är-wī′)
n.
A gene for maleness found on the Y chromosome. It has a key role in development of the testes and determination of sex.

SRY gene

One of the few genes on the Y chromosome. This gene promotes the development of the testes in males.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, comparing the electrophoretic analysis of the first and second-step PCR, it was evident that the results were false-negative for the presence of SRY gene in samples from groups 2 and 3 in the first-step reaction.
Mostly SRY gene is translocated to X chromosome, father is unaffected and not a carrier and there is no risk of this disorder in other siblings.
The university's study employed mutated SRY genes shared by a father and a sterile XY daughter.
In the absence of the SRY gene, typical female development begins as the undifferentiated gonads develop into ovaries at approximately 3 months of gestation.
Real-time PCR for rat SRY gene showed that survival of the donor cells in the Tan IIA + BMSCs group was significantly higher than that in MSC group 1 week after MI (0.
No sry gene was detected in lung tissue isolated from control, BLM and MSC groups (Fig.
One of these XY females has a point mutation in the SRY gene that changes a single amino acid in the SRY protein, making it inactive.
In this condition, the SRY gene on the Y chromosome tells the fetus's protogonads to become testes.
The presence of Sry gene expression in the recipient female rats was assessed by PCR.
6) Further, it is also possible for the SRY gene to exist on the X-chromosome as a result of translocations during meiosis.
More detailed genetic testing found that he had an SRY gene on one of the X chromosomes.
109) In 10% to 20% of women with Swyer syndrome, a deletion is present in the part of the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY gene) that encodes the DNA-binding region of the SRY protein, while in the remainder of cases, the SRY gene is normal and mutations in other testis-determining factors are likely implicated.