SPARCL


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SPARCL

Neurology A clinical trial–Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels
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(37.) Amarenco P, Goldstein LB, Szarek M, Sillesen H, Rudolph AE, Callahan A 3rd, et al, SPARCL Investigators.
Patients entered the SPARCL trial with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack within the previous 6 months, only mildly elevated cholesterol levels and no history of heart disease.
Another analysis, which collated data from 3 different clinical trials (TNT, SPARCL, and IDEAL) on atorvastatin, suggested that atorvastatin at the maximum dose (80 mg) increased the risk for new onset diabetes by 34%, and this was more obvious in the SPARCL trial [22].
(31.) Goldstein LB, Amarenco P, Lamonte M, et al; SPARCL investigators.
The study subjects were ambulatory men and women with no known coronary heart disease who had had ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or transient ischemic attack (TIA) 1-6 months before undergoing randomization in the SPARCL trial.
The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) study involved 4,731 people who had a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, or mini stroke.
Furthermore, the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) study found that statins use significantly reduced relapse risk in patients who had suffered cerebral ischemia or a transient ischemic attack.
The primary conclusion of the SPARCL clinical trial was that atorvastatin (Lipitor) reduced stroke risk in general.
The findings are based on a new analysis of data from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial.
The change in recommended statin use was also based on a study finding from the SPARCL (Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels) trial.
The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial enrolled patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack and LDL-C levels of 100 to 190 mg/dL, but without known CHD.
The update went on to say that in conformity with the American Heart Association's guidelines development policy, the guidelines "assume a class effect [for all statins] in the absence of data to the contrary," although the update also noted that it is currently unclear whether the risk reduction seen in SPARCL was a class effect or was more specific to the regimen of 80 mg/day of atorvastatin.