SARS-CoV

SARS-CoV

(sărz′kō-vē′)
An abbreviation for SARS coronavirus (the cause of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome).
References in periodicals archive ?
Although detection of SARS-CoV RNA in the plasma of SARS patients has been reported (1), the relatively low sensitivity of the ultracentrifugation-based approach for detecting SARS-CoV RNA in plasma has made this assay impractical.
Six cases of laboratory-confirmed infection with SARS-CoV have been identified; all were probable cases, as described previously (3,4).
However, transmission of bat SARS-CoV from bats to humans has not been reported.
SARS-CoV was isolated from the tracheal aspirate, and seroconversion was subsequently demonstrable.
Laboratory-confirmed infection, based on detection of antibody to SARS-CoV in serum or evidence of virus in clinical specimens by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis, has been identified in six patients; all were probable cases, as described previously (3,4).
SARS-CoV spreads from animals to humans by a rapid adaptation and evolution process (2,3).
In addition, clinical criteria have been revised to reflect the possible spectrum of respiratory illness associated with SARS-CoV.
SARS-CoV entered the human population as a result of a zoonotic transmission in southern People's Republic of China in 2002.
As of April 23, of the 245 reported SARS cases, 45(18%) have diagnostic SARS-CoV laboratory findings (i.
We detected antibody reactive with SARS-CoV antigen in 47 (6.
Because of the sudden and unpredictable nature of the SARS outbreaks that started in November 2002 in southern People's Republic of China, structured and reliable epidemiologic studies to conclusively trace the origin of SARS-CoV were not conducted.
Coronavirus infects the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds; the disease has a number of strains that infect humans, like the SARS-COV.