SAM-e


Also found in: Acronyms.

SAM-e

(sam'ē),
Abbreviation for S-adenosyl-l-methionine.

S-adenosylmethionine

(ă-dĕn″ō-sĭl″mĕ-thī′ŭ-nēn″),

SAM-e

A compound that is synthesized naturally in the central nervous system when folate and vitamin B12 levels are adequate. It is involved in the methylation of neurotransmitters, amino acids, proteins, phospholipids, and other neurochemicals. The chemical is used as a treatment for depression, liver disease, and osteoarthritis. It is an active sulfonium form of methionine that acts as a methyl group donor in various reactions (such as the formation of epinephrine or creatine).
References in periodicals archive ?
Improved stability utilizing the salts of SAM-e "is also directly correlated with the size and shape of the product itself in drying phase.
(14) In this manner it may serve to complement the actions of SAM-e. Efficient function of both the nervous and immune systems require an adequate supply of vitamin [B.sub.6].
(30) TMG plays a role in supporting the process of methyl donation either directly via the methylation of homocysteine, or indirectly by supporting the body's production of SAM-e.
Collectively, the combination of SAM-e and the other nutrients discussed above provides support for numerous health circumstances, and may also aide to improve intellectual performance.
But your pocketbook may prefer ibuprofen or aspirin, especially at the doses of SAM-e you may need.
study, researchers at the University of California, Irvine, gave 61 middle-aged adults with osteoarthritis of the knee 1,200 mg of SAM-e or 200 mg of the prescription drug Celebrex every day for four months.
"SAM-e took a month longer than Celebrex to work, but after one month they were equally effective at managing the participants' pain," says lead author Wadie Najm.
High doses of SAM-e may lessen symptoms of depression and ease arthritis pain in the knees ...
About half of the brands tested during the past few years contained less SAM-e than their labels claimed.
While testing SAM-e as a treatment for schizophrenia in the early 1970s, Italian researchers noted that it seemed to relieve depression in some patients (although it had no effect on schizophrenia).
Since then, at least 14 studies have compared SAM-e with look-alike (but SAM-e-free) placebos or with prescription antidepressants.
A 1994 meta-analysis pooled the results of the 13 studies then available into two larger studies, one comparing SAM-e with placebos, the other with antidepressant drugs.(1) The conclusion: SAM-e worked better than the placebos and about as well as the drugs.