Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

(redirected from S. maltophilia)

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

an opportunistic ocular bacterial pathogen producing keratitis, keratopathy, and conjunctivitis; a gram-negative nonsporebearing rod, a major emerging nosocomial pathogen, it is of especial importance in intensive care units in part because of its resistance to most penicillins and also to cephalosporins and aminoglycosides. Formerly called Xanthomonas maltophilia and Pseudomonas maltophilia.

Sten·o·tro·pho·mo·nas mal·to·phil·ia

(sten'ō-trō-fŏm'ō-năs mal'tō-fil'ē-ă)
An opportunistic, ocular, bacterial pathogen producing keratitis, keratopathy, and conjunctivitis; a gram-negative, non-spore-bearing rod. A nosocomial pathogen, of special importance in intensive care units in part because of its resistance to most penicillins and to cephalosporins and aminoglycosides. Formerly called Xanthomonas maltophilia and Pseudomonas maltophilia.

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

(stĕn′ō-trō-fō-mōn″as)
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STENOTROPHOMONAS INFECTION OF THE LEG
A gram-negative, motile, strictly anaerobic bacillus of the family Pseudomonadaceae. It may cause pneumonia, meningitis, endocarditis, conjunctivitis, wound infections, and infections related to the use of central venous catheters. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is used to treat infections with this organism. This species was formerly called Pseudomonas maltophila and Xanthomonas maltophila. See: illustration
References in periodicals archive ?
Bu calismada, S. maltophilia suslarinin yillar icindeki antimikrobiyal duyarlilik durumlari degerlendirilmis; ayrica seftazidim ve moksifloksasin kombinasyonunun, klinik orneklerden izole edilmis S.
Risk factors for S. maltophilia infection include prolonged hospitalization in intensive care units, medical devices, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and malignancy (1,2).
Pathology of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a NSTI, and multiple tissue cultures grew only S. maltophilia. Despite appropriate antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention, the patient remained persistently bacteremic and in refractory shock despite aggressive medical therapy.
S. maltophilia was first described by Hugh and Ryschenkow in 1961 [1] as a Gram-negative, glucose nonfermentative aerobic rod bacteria.
Background: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a multiple-antibiotic-resistant opportunistic pathogen that is being isolated with increasing frequency from patients with health-care-associated infections.
Treatment with S. maltophilia showed the most consistent highest inhibition effect, followed by P.
Blood and pus cultured from the site showed growth of S. maltophilia. A diagnosis of EG caused by S.
In humans, S. maltophilia is emerging as a significant cause for concern as an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial outbreaks in patients with a range of comorbidities including cystic fibrosis, neutrophenia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, anti-cancer chemotherapy, and organ transplant.
The finding that chronic infection with S. maltophilia is independently linked with an increased risk of exacerbations gives clinicians and researchers a new potential target in fighting their disease as well.
Thus, S. maltophilia is useful to recycle elements in the nature and for bioremediation purposes [16,17].