Staphylococcus lugdunensis

(redirected from S. lugdunensis)

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus lug·du·nen·sis

(stafi-lō-kokŭs lŭgdū-nensis)
A species of coagulase-negative staphlyococcus known to cause infections in wounds and elsewhere.

Staphylococcus lugdunensis

An aggressive coagulase-negative Staphyloccus species. It causes infections of soft tissues, the bloodstream, and prostheses.
See also: Staphylococcus
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, we report a case of a patient with SLE, who presented with left shoulder and knee pain and was found to have septic arthritis caused by a rare pathogen Staphylococcus lugdunensis (S. lugdunensis).
The synovial fluid culture showed sparse growth of S. lugdunensis. Subsequently, both joints were surgically washed out, and anterior synovectomy was performed.
Staphylococcus lugdunensis (S. lugdunensis) is a coagulase-negative bacterium (CoNS) that is considered a component of the normal skin colonizers.
Native valve endocarditis due to S. lugdunensis is typically community-acquired and associated with a high rate of complications and death.
At 48 hours, cultures grew S. lugdunensis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed diffuse soft-tissue edema, most prominent in the popliteal fossa around the knee and a large knee joint effusion with synovitis (Figure 1).
Native-joint septic arthritis caused by S. lugdunensis is rare.
Most often associated with infectious endocarditis, S. lugdunensis has also been described in osteomyelitis and periprosthetic joint infection (PJI).
Gatterman and colleagues examined 494 clinical coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates and found that 3% of isolates speciated to S. lugdunensis. (7) However, many labs do not routinely speciate CoNS, and it is likely that the true incidence of S.
The genes for the production of the chemical lugdunin, required for the killing of the pathogen, is present in all strains of S. lugdunensis, the study found.
Nasal swabs from 187 hospitalised patients showed that 5.9 per cent of people carrying S. lugdunensis had S.
Lugdunin is produced by the nostril-dwelling bacterium Staphylococcus lugdunensis (S. lugdunensis).
Infections with S. lugdunensis tend to have a more fulminant course, with an outcome resembling that of S.