Staphylococcus aureus

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Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

a common species found especially on nasal mucous membrane and skin (hair follicles); bacterial species that produces exotoxins including those that cause toxic shock syndrome, with resulting skin rash, and renal, hepatic, and central nervous system disease, and an enterotoxin associated with food poisoning; it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections; also a cause of infection in burn patients; humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.

Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus pyogenes Microbiology The most common pathogenic staphylococcus, which is often part of the normal human microflora, and linked to opportunistic infections Predisposing factors Nonspecific immune defects–Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, chronic granulomatous disease, hypogammaglobulinemia, folliculitis; skin injury–burns, surgery; presence of foreign bodies–eg, sutures, prosthetic devices; systemic disease–eg, CA, alcoholism, heart disease, viral infection; antibiotic therapy Clinical Folliculitis, bronchopneumonia

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

(staf'i-lō-kok'ŭs aw'rē-ŭs)
A bacterial common species found especially on nasal mucous membranes and skin (hair follicles); it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections, and food poisoning; also a cause of infection in burn patients. Humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

(staf'i-lō-kok'ŭs aw'rē-ŭs)
Common species found especially on nasal mucous membranes and skin (hair follicles); bacterial species that produces exotoxins including those that cause toxic shock syndrome, with resulting skin rash, and renal, hepatic, and central nervous system disease, and an enterotoxin associated with food poisoning; it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections; also a cause of infection in burn patients; humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.

Patient discussion about Staphylococcus aureus

Q. What is MRSA? I’ve heard on the news that some hospitals have a higher rate of MRSA infection. What is MRSA?

A.
MRSA - Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, is a nick name for a specific subtype of bacteria from the Staph bacteria family, which is found resistant to many of the common antibiotics that are in use today. This is due to a mutation development in the Staph bacteria, which allowed it to grow resistance against the killing ingredient in common antibiotics, therefore making it a harder infection to treat and cure. Hospitals keep track of their MRSA infections for epidemiological reasons, in order to get a perspective on bacterial resistance to antibiotics, hoping new and more effective antibiotic medication will be researched.

Q. My father was hospitalized for pneumonia. The doctors said they are afraid of HA-MRSA. Why is it so scary? My father was hospitalized for pneumonia last week. The doctors wanted to discharge him as quick as possible because they said that they are afraid of Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA). Why is it so scary?

A. Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of sepsis and death due to the fact that are very limited antibiotics that kill it.
Because of this it is the nightmare of doctors.
This bacteria is very durable and is very common in hospitals, and because of it, its always better to be at the hospital the minimum time needed.

Q. can staphylococcus in woman cause infertility? staphylococcus/infertility

A. Not that I know about. One of the major routes in which bacteria cause infertility in women is through inflammation of the pelvis (PID), but staphylococcus isn't a major cause of this disease.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000888.htm

More discussions about Staphylococcus aureus
References in periodicals archive ?
The overall purpose of this study was to investigate whether S. aureus was present on the floors and barres of a university's dance studios, with anticipation of setting the stage for future investigations into MRSA presence on these surfaces that dancers routinely contact.
A reduction in pHin and cell membrane hyperpolarization were observed in S. aureus after it was treated with chlorogenic acid.
It could promote S. aureus nasal colonization, putting some people at increased risk for infection.
"About one-third of all people are persistent S. aureus carders, another third are occasional carriers, and a remaining third don't seem to carry S.
S. aureus has been demonstrated in health care workers; they carry it in their hands and also could be present in medical devices.
Community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains have been identified as being highly clonal and virulent, responsible for around 30 % of S. aureus infections (8) and are probably the most important challenge to routine clinical practice regading managing infectious diseases.
"People have been saying that maybe we should culture pregnant women" to determine whether they have anovaginal S. aureus colonization, "but it's a huge expense, and you'd have to really convince yourself that it matters," said Dr.
Despite the fact that S. aureus is more relevant in the etiology of bovine mastitis in comparison to other species of the genus (ROBERSON et al., 1996) and that its control requires the adoption of specific measures, the precise identification of this microorganism is not carried out by the majority of laboratories.
The study, conducted by the Rutgers University in the US, showed the two genes, named copB and copL, in some strains of S. aureus bacteria protect the germs from copper.
In contrast, S. aureus normally colonize in skin and mucous membranes in the upper respiratory tract of healthy individuals without any complications, but in immunocompropised people, S.
Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important pathogen causing a great number of infectious diseases.