S antigen

S an·ti·gen

[MIM*181031]
1. Synonym(s): soluble antigen
2. a photoreceptor protein found in rods and in the pineal gland, exerting an inhibitory function in the light transduction cascade. Synonym(s): arrestin
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Sybari's Antigen for Microsoft Exchange has consistently demonstrated its ability to protect networks and defend against e-mail viruses such as Fbound.
Today, over 6 million Microsoft Exchange/Outlook and Lotus Domino/Notes seats are virus-free as a direct result of Sybari's Antigen technology.
Today, more than 6 million Microsoft Exchange/Outlook and Lotus Domino/Notes seats are virus-free as a direct result of Sybari's Antigen technology.
Scientists at the National Eye Institute in Bethesda, Md., report in the May American Journal of Ophthalmology that retinal S antigen, a purified protein derived from cow eyes, may enable physicians to wean some patients off steroids without their uveitis flaring up.
Of 45 people whose autoimmune-based uveitis was being held in check with steroids and other medication, 10 received pure retinal S antigen orally, 10 got a mixture of other cow retinal constituents, 10 took a combination of the S antigen and the bovine mixture, and 15 received a placebo.
S antigen may also prove useful in preventing rejection of corneal grafts, they suggest.
Caspi has found that low doses of a retinal protein known as retinal S antigen prevent the inflammatory eye disease uveitis in mice.
Because Caspi's results might benefit uveitis patients, who must take immunosuppressants in order to retain their vision, NEI's Scott Whitcup and Robert Nussenblatt tested retinal S antigen in two patients.
The researchers fed the volunteers very small amounts of retinal S antigen three times a week, then took the patients off their immunosuppressant drugs.
Ten will get retinal S antigen, 10 will get a mixture of other retinal proteins, 10 will get both retinal S antigen and the mixture, and 15 will receive a placebo.
Considering HIV's relatively small genome, Barry's group has been looking at using an entire expression library as a "genomic vaccine" representing all or many of HIV's antigens. The question is whether such an expression library immunization (ELI) vaccine could deliver multivalent epitopes to drive immune responses to HIV.