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rhythm

 [rith´m]
a measured movement; the recurrence of an action or function at regular intervals. adj., adj rhyth´mic, rhyth´�mical.
accelerated idiojunctional rhythm a junctional rhythm, without retrograde conduction to the atria, at a rate exceeding the normal firing rate of the junction; it is an ectopic rhythm located in the bundle of His and controlling ventricles at a rate of 60 to 100 beats per minute.
accelerated idioventricular rhythm a rhythm of ectopic ventricular origin, faster than the normal rate of the His-Purkinje system but slower than 100 beats per minute, without retrograde conduction to the atria.
accelerated junctional rhythm a rhythm emanating from a focus in the AV junction at a rate greater than its normal rate of 60 but less than 100 beats per minute; it may be due to altered automaticity secondary to disease or to triggered activity secondary to digitalis toxicity. There may or may not be retrograde conduction to the atria.
alpha rhythm uniform rhythm of waves in the normal electroencephalogram, showing an average frequency of 10 per second, typical of a normal person awake in a quiet resting state. Called also Berger rhythm. See also electroencephalography.
atrioventricular junctional rhythm a junctional rhythm originating in the bundle of His, with a heart rate of 40 to 60 beats per minute; called also nodal rhythm.
automatic rhythm spontaneous rhythms initiated by the sinoatrial node, or by subsidiary atrial or ventricular pacemakers; in practice this refers to a normal sinus rhythm at a rate of 60 to 100 beats per minute.
Berger rhythm alpha rhythm.
beta rhythm a rhythm in the electroencephalogram consisting of waves smaller than those of the alpha rhythm, having an average frequency of 25 per second, typical during periods of intense activity of the nervous system. See also electroencephalography.
biological r's the cyclic changes that occur in physiological processes of living organisms; these rhythms are so persistent in nature that they probably should be considered a fundamental characteristic of life, as are growth, reproduction, metabolism, and irritability. Many of the physiological processes that recur in humans about every 24 hours (with circadian rhythm) have been known for centuries. Examples include the peaks and troughs seen in body temperature, vital signs, brain function, and muscular activity. Biochemical analyses of urine, blood enzymes, and plasma serum also have demonstrated circadian rhythms. Called also biorhythms.



It has long been believed that the cyclic changes observed in plants and animals were totally in response to environmental changes and, as such, were exogenous or of external origin. This hypothesis has now been rejected by most chronobiologists, who hold that the biological rhythms are intrinsic to the organisms, and that the organisms possess their own physiological mechanism for keeping time. This mechanism has been called the “biological clock.” An example of adjustment of the biological clock in humans is recovery from “jet lag.” This phenomenon, also known as jet syndrome, occurs when humans are transported by jet plane across time zones. It is characterized by fatigue and lowered efficiency, which persist until the biological clock adjusts to the new environmental cycle.

Biological rhythms are responsive to, or synchronous with, environmental cycles, but it is generally agreed among chronobiologists that the rhythmic changes in environmental factors do not create biological rhythms, even though they are capable of influencing them. Even in the absence of such environmental stimuli as light, darkness, temperature, gravity, and electromagnetic field, biological rhythms continue to maintain their cyclic nature for a period of time.
circadian rhythm the regular recurrence in cycles of about 24 hours from one point to another, such as certain biological activities that do this regardless of long periods of darkness or other changes in environmental conditions.
circamensual rhythm recurrence in cycles of about one month (30 days).
circannual rhythm recurrence of a phenomenon in cycles of about one year.
circaseptan rhythm that which occurs in cycles of about seven days (one week).
coupled rhythm heart beats occurring in pairs, the second beat of the pair usually being a ventricular premature beat.
delta rhythm
1. electroencephalographic waves having a frequency below 3½ per second, typical in deep sleep, in infancy, and in serious brain disorders. See also electroencephalography.
2. delta waves.
escape rhythm a heart rhythm initiated by lower centers when the sinoatrial node fails to initiate impulses, its rhythmicity is depressed, or its impulses are completely blocked.
gallop rhythm an auscultatory finding of three or four heart sounds, created by gushes of blood entering resistant or stiffened ventricles. This can happen at two different times during ventricular diastole: either at initial filling or at the time of ventricular contraction. Therefore, gallops occur during early and late ventricular diastole.
gamma rhythm a rhythm in the waves in the electroencephalogram having a frequency of 50 per second. See also electroencephalography.
idiojunctional rhythm a rhythm emanating from the atrioventricular junction but without retrograde conduction to the atria.
infradian rhythm the regular recurrence in cycles of more than 24 hours, as certain biological activities which occur at such intervals, regardless of conditions of illumination or other environmental conditions.
junctional rhythm an arrhythmia caused by an abnormality in the atrioventricular junction; see accelerated junctional rhythm and atrioventricular junctional rhythm.
rhythm method old popular name for natural family planning.
nyctohemeral rhythm a day and night rhythm.
pendulum rhythm alternation in the rhythm of the heart sounds in which the diastolic sound is equal in time, character, and loudness to the systolic sound, the beat of the heart resembling the tick of a watch.
sinus rhythm normal heart rhythm originating in the sinoatrial node, with a normal rate of 60 to 100 beats per minute.
theta rhythm electroencephalographic waves having a frequency of 4 to 7 per second, occurring mainly in children but also in adults under emotional stress. See also electroencephalography.
ultradian rhythm the regular recurrence in cycles of less than 24 hours, as certain biological activities which occur at such intervals, regardless of conditions of illumination or other environmental conditions.
ventricular rhythm the ventricular contractions which occur in cases of complete heart block.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

rhyth·m

(ridh'ŭm),
1. Measured time or motion; the regular alternation of two or more different or opposite states.
See also: wave.
2.
See also: wave. Synonym(s): rhythm method
3. Regular or irregular occurrence of an electrical event in the electrocardiogram or electroencephalogram.
See also: wave.
4. Sequential beating of the heart generated by a single beat or sequence of beats.
[G. rhythmos]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

rhythm

Alternative medicine
A component of dance therapy that corresponds to repeating patterns of movement, which contain and organise expression of emotional states.

Obstetrics
Rhythm method, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

rhythm

Medtalk A periodic movement; an action which occurs at regular intervals. See Alpha rhythm, Biologic rhythm, Circadian rhythm, Kappa rhythm.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rhythm

(ridh'ŭm)
1. Measured time or motion.
2. The regular alternation of two or more different or opposite states.
3. Synonym(s): rhythm method.
4.Regular occurrence of an electrical event in the electroencephalogram.
See also: wave
5. A regular sequence of heart beats.
[G. rhythmos]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

rhythm

the regular occurrence of strong and weak impulses of a particular phenomenon.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

rhythm

(ridh'ŭm)
Measured time or motion; the regular alternation of two or more different or opposite states.
[G. rhythmos]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Rythm Mastr took on a second form when the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette agreed to run a single panel from the comic for eight weeks in its Tuesday magazine section.
Celle-ci correspond a un melange de soul, de blues, de jazz, de hip hop, de rythm and blues et de musique traditionnelle marocaine.
After putting an end to their long-running feud that has been going on for years, the "Chained to the Rythm" singer said she hopes to find herself "in a place of love and forgiveness and understanding and compassion" with Swift, as per (http://www.torontosun.com/2017/06/11/i-forgive-taylor-swift-and-im-sorry-for-anything-i-ever-did-katy-perry) Toronto Sun .
Visit our archive at Artforum.com/inprint to read Marshall's discussion of his Rythm Mastr comics (Summer 2014).
A do, cafwyd perfformiad gwirioneddol ysgytwol gyda pherfformwyr o gerddorion yn cyd-uno i wneud pob mathau o seiniau gyda llyfrau: roedd un yn torri dalen ar y tro i rythm penodol, un arall yn cau'r llyfr yn glep fel pe'n drymio, un arall wedyn yn cael siffrwd y dalennau.
From July to August 2009 the annual growth of prices of consumer goods and services, has ranged between 3.5% - 3.7%, slightly above the upper limit of deviation from the inflation target set by the National Bank of Poland, followed in September by a slowed rythm of 3.4%.
Successful Elections in Africa) is based on the direct experience of the author (who was an electoral observer for several elections in different African states) and explains that the limitation of power is indicative for the absence of a unique rythm within the development of African countries.
On admission, she had a respiratory rate of 15 breaths/minute, a blood pressure of 120/70 mmHg, and a heart rate of about 78 beats/minute with sinus rythm. Chest auscultation revealed the presence of normal lung sounds.
"But when you have a job that is rewarding, varied and interesting and where you are valued extremely highly by your colleagues in other departments and the owners of the business, then why would you leave?" Rythm Jain Saigal, chief executive of Avocet Hardware, said: "Call centres have given telesales something of a bad name, but to us it is a vital element of our business strategy and as such is staffed solely by industry professionals with the kind of expertise that would make our competitors green with envy."
More importantly, Manchester City's focus on giving back to the community through football finds resonance with QNET's philosophy of RYTHM which is "Raise Yourself To Help Mankind," noted Mayer.