Russian

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Russian

associated in some way with Russia.

Russian blue
a breed of cats with short, dense, silver-tipped blue-colored coat and vivid green eyes.
Russian heavy draft
heavy draft or milk Russian horse, usually chestnut, also brown or bay.
Russian rabbit
a breed of white domestic rabbit with black extremities.
Russian trotter
light horse bred by mating Orlov horse and American trotters; all coat colors.
Russian wolfhound
see borzoi.
References in classic literature ?
A Russian prince condescended to sit in a corner for an hour and talk with a massive lady, dressed like Hamlet's mother in black velvet with a pearl bridle under her chin.
The two Russians made good farm-hands, and in summer they worked out together.
Insensibly this mass of almost annihilated beings became so compact, so deaf, so torpid, so happy perhaps, that Marechal Victor, who had been their heroic defender by holding twenty thousand Russians under Wittgenstein at bay, was forced to open a passage by main force through this forest of men in order to cross the Beresina with five thousand gallant fellows whom he was taking to the emperor.
As China was the grand mart for the furs collected in these quarters, the Russians had the advantage over their competitors in the trade.
Dirkovitch was a Russian - a Russian of the Russians - who appeared to get his bread by serving the Czar as an officer in a Cossack regiment, and corresponding for a Russian newspaper with a name that was never twice alike.
We are French, we are English, we are American, we are German; and, I believe, there are some Russians and Hungarians expected.
I talked to the Russians a good deal, just to be friendly, and they talked to me from the same motive; I am sure that both enjoyed the conversation, but never a word of it either of us understood.
I meant to ask you before--many people are unbelievers nowadays, especially Russians, I have been told.
I am convinced that we Russians must die or conquer," he concluded, conscious- as were others- after the words were uttered that his remarks were too enthusiastic and emphatic for the occasion and were therefore awkward.
HE had followed the trail of his fleeing people for eleven days, and his pursuit had been in itself a flight; for behind him he knew full well were the dreaded Russians, toiling through the swampy lowlands and over the steep divides, bent on no less than the extermination of all his people.
But it was not so much from ill-health as from pride--so Princess Shtcherbatskaya interpreted it--that Madame Stahl had not made the acquaintance of anyone among the Russians there.
It had been ten years since the Russian had escaped the fate of his friend, the arch-fiend Rokoff, and not once, but many times during those ten years had Paulvitch cursed the fate that had given to Nicholas Rokoff death and immunity from suffering while it had meted to him the hideous terrors of an existence infinitely worse than the death that persistently refused to claim him.