Ruffini corpuscle

(redirected from Ruffini ending)
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Ruf·fi·ni cor·pus·cle

(rūf-ē'nē kōr'pŭs-ĕl)
Sensory end-structure in the subcutaneous connective tissues of the fingers, consisting of an ovoid capsule within which the sensory fiber ends with numerous collateral knobs.

Ruffini corpuscle

One of the encapsulated sensory nerve endings found in the dermis and in subcutaneous tissue, once thought to mediate the sense of warmth, now believed to be a pressure receptor.
Synonym: organ of Ruffini
See also: Ruffini, Angelo
References in periodicals archive ?
In the dermis, there are Ruffini endings and Pacinian corpuscles in a glabrous (or hairless) skin, whereas there is a complex combination of mechanoreceptors and their associated nerves and hair follicle receptors in a hairy skin [23, 24].
Strong touches, on the other hand, activate two, deeper receptors: the Pacinian and Ruffini endings. Both of these nerve endings are sensitive to strong pressure and vibration.
Merkel cells and Ruffini endings show slowly adapting irregular pulse trains (group II).
The irritability that some people experience when the scab is present could be attributed to the increased tension developed in the dermal region, resulting in heightened sensory stimulation of the variety of sensory receptors which reside in the region, including Meisner's corpuscles (fine and discriminative touch), Paccinian corpuscles (coarse touch and pressure), Ruffini endings (subcutaneous stretch) and others.
Fast-adapting type I (Meissner's corpuscles) and slow-adapting types I and II (Merkel cells and Ruffini endings, resp.) A[beta] mechanoreceptors have dense innervations within perioral and intraoral structures, including the hairy skin of the face, glabrous skin of the lips, oral mucosa, and the anterior tip of the tongue.
Accordingly, on page 36, at the bottom of the left column, the last two lines should be changed to read as follows: "...and joint receptors (Golgi ligament endings, Ruffini endings, Pacinian corpuscles, and free...."
Mechanoreceptors such as Meissner's corpuscles, Pacinian corpuscles, Merkel's disks, and Ruffini endings are responsible for the detection of tactile input.
Traditionally, these receptors are classified as muscle spindles (Ia and II fibers), Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) and joint afferents (GTOs, Ruffini endings, Pacinian corpuscles, and free nerve endings).