Royal College of Anaesthetists


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Royal College of Anaesthetists

The professional organisation in the UK which is responsible for the specialty of anaesthesia, educating and training consultant anaesthetists and setting standards in anaesthesia, critical care and pain management.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1.) Royal college of Anaesthetists UK, Documents on application for The An aesthesia Clinical Services Accreditation (ACSA).
Some patients develop post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) and require psychological treatment and counselling (Royal College of Anaesthetists).
The Royal College of Anaesthetists suggests that, in keeping with best practice, the conversion rate from spinal anaesthesia to a GA should be <1% for elective CS and <3% for non-elective CS.
Professor Mike Grocott, chair of NELA and council member of the Royal College of Anaesthetists, which led the report, said: "Shortfalls in the perioperative care of these patients before, during and after major surgery may be negatively affecting patient outcomes and use of resources.
Richard Johnson gave a comprehensive break-down of the results of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland survey, concerning accidental awareness during general anaesthesia.
The Royal College of Anaesthetists and Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland both support the original view that a consultant should "typically" have 2.5 SPAs in their contract (though this would have to be subject to individual workload).
The first in a series of two, this study guide helps readers prepare for the UK's Primary FRCA (Fellowship of the Royal College of Anaesthetists) Structured Oral Examination by providing answers to questions regularly asked by examiners.
It happens about 150 times a year, the study for the Royal College of Anaesthetists revealed.
Commission on Provision of Surgical Services (Royal College of Surgeons England, Royal College of Anaesthetists) reported in 1990 that despite advances in pain management, about 75% patients suffer from moderate to severe pain in the postoperative period.
And the Royal College of Anaesthetists has recommended critical care bed occupancy level is 70% saying persistent bed occupancy of more than that suggests that a unit is too small.
It comes after concerns from medical groups over the Welsh Government's progress in implementing plans to improve diagnosis and survival rates, with the Royal College of Anaesthetists warning patients faced "sub-optimal care" or having surgery cancelled due to a lack of critical care beds.

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