Roy Adaptation Model

Roy Adaptation Model

(roy)
A conceptual model of nursing developed by Callista Roy. Individuals and groups are adaptive systems with physiological/physical, self-concept/group identity, role function, and interdependence modes of response to focal, contextual, and residual environmental stimuli. The goal of nursing is promotion of adaptation through increasing, decreasing, maintaining, removing, altering, or changing environmental stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, a study was conducted where the influence of a support group intervention based on the Roy Adaptation Model (RAM) on sexual adaptation, body image and perceived support was examined at the Daytime Treatment Center of a University Hospital in Turkey in 2016.
The Roy Adaptation Model (RAM) (Roy, 2009; Roy & Andrews, 1991) served as a nursing model that guided the process to understand the nurse as an adaptive system functioning for a purposeful cause.
Specifically, there was an emphasis on Orem, as concept of self-care was appealing not only to educators but to clinicians as did Roy and the Roy Adaptation Model. Rogers and Parse were also popular as they focused on nursing, environment, relationships, and true presence.
Each of the studies provided results helpful to patients, but they also provided support for the Roy Adaptation Model. The figures in this article are useful examples of how to make clear connections between concepts within a theory or model and the measurement instruments.
The Roy Adaptation Model, Appleton & Lange, Stamford, Conn, USA, 1999.
The schematic representation of the application of the components of the Roy Adaptation Model to the current study variable is diagrammed in Table 1.
of Southern Mississippi) explains both historical and newer nursing theories and their application in practice, including philosophies, conceptual models, middle-range theories, and major theories including the environmental model, theory of transpersonal caring, behavioral system model, Roy adaptation model, theory of interpersonal relations, theory of human becoming, nursing process theory, and self-transcendence theory.
The DBP is a psychosocial intervention that is grounded in a model referred to as the Roy Adaptation Model (RAM) (Roy & Andrews, 1999).
The program is integrated, with four con cepts in nursing care courses taught across the lifespan using the Roy Adaptation Model. Certain areas, such as obstetrics and maternal/child health, are compartmentalized, while others, such pediatrics and psychiatric nursing, are woven throughout the curriculum.
A study of burn survivors' adaptation was based on concepts in the Roy Adaptation Model (Roy and Andrews, 1999) and was done through a national website support group for burn survivors (Foster, 2002).