Roux-en-y gastric bypass


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Roux-en-y gastric bypass

A bariatric surgical procedure in which the superior portion of the stomach is isolated from the rest of the stomach and the jejunum is connected to it. As a result, food passes directly from the proximal stomach into the middle of the small intestine. It bypasses the majority of the stomach, which is isolated from the working portion of the stomach and from the duodenum. An opening is made in the duodenum and the jejunum, and the two organs are connected via a surgical stoma. This permits drainage into the jejunum of gastric secretions from the isolated greater curvature of the stomach. This form of gastric bypass is the most common bariatric surgical procedure and among the most successful. Since the duodenum absorbs many important vitamins and nutrients, including iron, vitamin B12, and calcium, nutritional deficiencies and iron-deficiency anemia are common complications. Others include nausea, vomiting, ulcers, and anastomotic leaks.
See also: bypass
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of nutritional status during the first year after sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Obes Surg 2014; 24: 276-283.
Febres et al., "Prospective study of gut hormone and metabolic changes after adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass," International Journal of Obesity, vol.
Retrograde intussusception after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity.
Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding is now promoted as a safer, potentially reversible and effective alternative to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current standard of care.
Laparoscopic conversion of vertical banded gastroplasty with an antireflux wrap into Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Obes Surg 2007;17(7):901 4.
Major Finding: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was safe and effective for achieving weight loss in morbidly obese adolescents aged 13,17.
The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RGBP) procedure, considered the gold standard in weight loss operations, involves creating an intestinal bypass while simultaneously decreasing stomach size; this technique is considered both restrictive and malabsorptive (Hydock, 2005).
Obese patients who undergo Roux-en-Y gastric bypass have a reduction in cardiovascular risk relative to their untreated peers of up to 79%, based on Framingham risk scores, according to a report in the October 1st issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.
Smith said, adding that this is the first study to look at sexual function in men after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Previous research assessed only nonsurgical weight loss options, with inconsistent results.
The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a combination procedure that can be performed either laparoscopically or as open surgery.
The most commonly performed bariatric surgery, the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), is a combination restrictive/malabsorptive procedure.