rote learning

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Related to Rote memory: Rote memorization, Logical memory

rote learn·ing

the learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.

rote learn·ing

(rōt lĕrn'ing)
The learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
Otherwise, students resort to rote memory and are confirmed in the idea that science is dull memorization.
How to transmit such experiences without making them a burden, intellectual (rote memory) or moral (paralyzing memory)?
Their test scores are high because their entire education system lends itself to rote memory and rote-memory application.
The task, says Terrace, is comparable to many instances in which humans use rote memory, such as punching in a seven-digit number on a pushbutton telephone.
While memorization gives the mind some exercise, I believe that testing rote memory should not be considered for a grade as it is the lowest form of "learning." I knew a handful of people who could memorize whole books, but I admired them only if they could go beyond rote and find connections in the data that make history meaningful.
The use of search engines, the study asserts, suggests that human memory is reorganizing where it goes for information, adapting to new computing technologies rather than relying solely on rote memory.
From the most basic awareness of our environment, our memory skills progress from rote memory, working (short-term) memory, patterning and connections to relational memory, and, ultimately, long-term memory storage.
This finding suggests that the benefits of distributed practice extend to abstract mathematics problems and not just rote memory cognitive tasks.
During our session for last Sunday's exam in Political Law, some committee members noted that the questions were not genuine Multiple Choice Questions (or MCQs, as they are now famously called) but rather mere tests of rote memory, even of guesswork and, worse, the right answer sometimes was sometimes obvious on the face of the question itself.
A new movement in education advocates using movement to aid in rote memory of facts.
An overemphasis on rote memory. Ironically, few math teachers stress memory as a major factor in learning math, nor do they believe that memorizing formulae or processes is the best approach (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 1989).
In recognition of the fact that understanding is a step above rote memory, the author urged his friend to elaborate.