rote learning

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rote learn·ing

the learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.

rote learn·ing

(rōt lĕrn'ing)
The learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chan's (1999) evidence contradicts this, suggesting that Chinese students are not passive, uncritical rote learners. Chan found that Asian students engage in deep learning through metacognitive strategies such as monitoring and learning from mistakes and they are critical thinkers, but do not openly express themselves like Australian students.
However, for the individual variables, students found learning satisfying, studied topics in depth, and were able to learn from their mistakes, supporting Chan's (1999) finding that Chinese students are not passive, uncritical rote learners and that they engage in metacognitive strategies.
These findings only partly support those of Carney and Levin (1998, Experiment 4) who found that the mean recall of the learners in the two keyword conditions was statistically significantly superior to that of rote learners on each testing occasion, even on the third occasion following a 5-day delay.
Gail Jones (1996) looked at motivation and strategy use and questioned whether females were rote learners. After studying 213 5th- and 6th-grade students' self-reports of confidence, motivational goals and learning strategies, Meech and Jones (1996) found few gender differences.