rotator cuff

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rotator cuff

n.
1. An anatomical structure composed of the tendons of four muscles that control rotation of the shoulder and of parts of the capsule of the shoulder joint.
2. The set of four muscles that control rotation of the shoulder.

rotator cuff

The tendinous structure around the shoulder joint consisting of the tendons of four adjacent muscles blended with the capsule of the joint. Tearing or degeneration of any of these fibres may cause the common, painful and disabling rotator cuff syndrome in which there may be inability to raise the arm in a particular direction. Surgical repair may be necessary.

Patient discussion about rotator cuff

Q. what does c4-5 mild central disk bulging impinging upon cervical cord without spinal stenosis or distortion of the cord . mild righ neural foraminal narrowing from uncovertebral joint hypertropy mean

A. Well this basically means there is a very small narrowing of the cervical (your neck area) spinal canal (where the spinal cord is), however the narrowing does not cause any damage to the spinal cord, therefore probably does not cause any major symptoms involving the nerves. The c4-5 bulging part refers to the part in between the two cervical vertebras c4 and c5, in which the disc (a part in the spinal cord) is sliding a bit side-ways, but again, it does not seem to be causing any trouble.

More discussions about rotator cuff
References in periodicals archive ?
[15] conducted a research in which they identified risk factors for rotator cuff injuries in general population.
According to Xie, rotator cuff injuries are among the most common conditions affecting the shoulder and can occur from falls or repetitive motions like throwing a baseball.
They come in for Achilles heel (foot) and rotator cuff injuries.
Fat suppression technique was applied and has been shown to improve sensitivity of MR evaluation of rotator cuff injuries. (26)
To avoid rotator cuff injuries, Christy now does "waving to the plane," holding a small dumbbell in each hand, three times a week.
Most people have heard of sudden rotator cuff injuries in athletes during a competitive event.
Shoulder injuries in golfers usually affect the lead shoulder and include acromioclavicular joint impingement, anterior labral impingement, classic supraspinous impingement, and tightness in the posterior capsule, as well as rotator cuff injuries.
However, a controlled study of 125 people (age 19 to 66) with severe rotator cuff injuries found that a supervised exercise program brought about the same significant improvements as surgery.
There are 4 million Americans with rotator cuff injuries, and all are at risk for disability.
So what can athletes do to prevent rotator cuff injuries? Like all other sports-related injuries, prevention entails education, physical conditioning and practice.
* All patients with shoulder pain with a clinical suspicion of rotator cuff injuries.
There are currently no FDA-approved therapies using engineered cells for the treatment of rotator cuff injuries, added the company.