New Deal

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New Deal

A work compensation and conditions package agreed to by junior doctors’ representatives, NHS management, and Government in 1999, which was designed to address the unsocial hours and poor working conditions to which junior doctors where subjected. The maximum contracted hours for each work pattern by junior doctors was agreed as:
• 72 hours/week for on-call rotas;
• 64 hours/week for partial shifts;
• 56 hours/week for full shifts.

New Deal for Junior Doctors
• Limits on number of hours worked/week and on work during unsocial hours;
• Safety and security (job protection);
• Protected rest periods;
• Acceptable accommodations;
• Catering facilities that meet quality standards;
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The changes will come more haltingly and piecemeal than they did in Roosevelt's New Deal, because the leap from nation-state to global order is far greater than that from state capitols to Pennsylvania Avenue.
They supported Roosevelt's New Deal and his opposition to fascism, and welcomed the leadership of Reinhold Niebuhr, the influential theologian and political ethicist.
The Act was a spin-off of President Roosevelt's New Deal, which was aimed at supporting prices and stimulating recovery from the Great Depression.
America during Roosevelt's New Deal did not become a one-party state; it had no secret police; the Constitution remained in force, and there were no concentration camps; the New Deal preserved the institutions of the liberal-democratic system that National Socialism abolished." But throughout the '30s, intellectuals and journalists noted "areas of convergence among the New Deal, Fascism, and National Socialism." All three were seen as transcending "classic Anglo-French liberalism"--individualism, free markets, decentralized power.
The dominant Christianity found expression not in the current narrow-mindedness of the fight, but in the generosity of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. Of course, part of the reason for these differences was the people themselves--their egalitarianism, their generosity, and their willingness to sacrifice for the common good.
His theory of monetarism, adopted in part by the Nixon, Ford and Reagan administrations, opposed the traditional Keynesian economics that had dominated US policy since Roosevelt's New Deal. Friedman favoured a policy of steady, moderate growth in the money supply, opposed wage and price controls and criticised the Federal Reserve when it tried to intervene in the economy.
But, as part of Roosevelt's New Deal, Willa and her family have a chance to live better--it's a difficult decision for Willa because if she stays with her own family, she must turn her back on Johnny and her other friends whose parents are foreign-born, who can't take part in the government program.
Friedman's ideas underlie the generationlong trend toward privatization and deregulation, and put both Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal and Lyndon Johnson's Great Society on the defensive.
Under Roosevelt's New Deal, American capitalism came under some regulation.
history--independence from the British crown, the abolition of slavery, Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal economic recovery program, the fight against racial discrimination in the 1960s, the Republican revolution of the last quarter of the 20th century (deemed by critics as a revolution waged by the rich against the poor)--generally took place during times when everyone thought things would stay the same forever.
In the larger economic picture, despite Roosevelt's New Deal, the economy remained all but comatose, and Roosevelt continued brewing his alphabet soup of federal agencies and programs.