Roman numeral

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Roman numeral

(rō′măn)
One of the letters used by the ancient Romans for numeration, as distinct from the arabic numerals that we now use. In Roman notation, values are changed either by adding one or more symbols to the initial symbol or by subtracting a symbol to the right of it. For example, V is 5, IV is 4, and VI is 6. Hence, because X is 10, IX is 9 and XI is 11.
Roman numerals in
References in periodicals archive ?
The chords are converted to Roman numerals (similar to figured bass playing in the Baroque period of music), where the Roman numeral designates the scale degree on which the chord is built), and for each Roman numeral there is a particular chord shape (inversion) to play in the left hand.
Although Roman numerals, invented in about the 7th or 8th centuries B.C., helped in adding or subtracting, they made a nightmare of multiplying, Nicols said.
You'd think clock-makers of all people would know Roman numerals! But this is how it should be.
How is the number 44 usually written in Roman numerals? 2.
The unit converter will also let one convert from our standard base-10 number system (0 through 9) to roman numerals, hexadecimal, octal, or binary systems, the report added.
These use a mixture of foreign language names, Roman numerals, punctuation characters and generally unfamiliar terms.
Not only that, but they insist on showing the date in Roman numerals (classier, I suppose).
What number is represented in Roman numerals as a V with a line above it?
This clock is slightly larger and has Roman numerals and a bevelled rim with more than a hint of days gone by.
Which word can be formed by expressing 1009 in Roman numerals?
Youngsters helped their parents make their costumes then spent the day creating mosaics, practising roman numerals, making jewellery and piecing together a jigsaw of broken pottery.
The whimsical mural will feature a life-sized Glockenspiel, each detail mirroring clocks found in major European cities, including astrological signs and Roman numerals on the clock face as well as open-faced gears.