Rogue Site


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia.
(1) A website that engages in questionable or unethical practices—which may be shut down by authorities in one state, only to re-open shortly thereafter in another state
(2) A popular term for an internet-based pharmacy that is essentially a 'front' from which narcotics, antidepressants, stimulants, steroids, and even counterfeit drugs are marketed
References in periodicals archive ?
117) Unlike the rogue sites that distribute drugs without any prescription, these sites are more likely found within the borders of the United States, making prosecution easier.
It's thought that whoever was responsible for creating the rogue site must have done so using a computer that is not part of the school network.
The question then may be this: Has the development of the internet led us to a place where such interference is necessary and perhaps even required to contain rogue sites and protect American consumers?
They fear, too, that suits against rogue sites will produce collateral dam-age to legitimate online businesses.
But the recently passed Senate legislation (the House of Representatives has approved a version as well) is designed to curb the rogue sites.
Cyber criminals attempting to steal identity via rogue sites will receive only scrambled data that cannot be used.
The Sunday Mercury contacted the webmasters of the rogue sites, but they were unavailable for comment.
Stay away from rogue sites that say you don't need a prescription.
In May 1997, Middleberg co-authored an article for CE, "Tales From the Dark Side of Cyberspace," in which he explained such new phenomena as rogue sites and "flaming.
These plausible prices allow bargain hunters to feel they are getting a good deal on legitimate merchandise, especially when coupled with the increasing tendency for rogue sites to feature brands' recent marketing campaigns and photographs.
WASHINGTON -- Although the exact number of rogue Internet pharmacies is unknown, one estimate suggests that there were over 36,000 in operation as of February 2014, and these rogue sites violate a variety of federal laws, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office.