Rogers


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Rogers

 [roj´erz]
Martha E. (died 1994). A leader in community health nursing, visiting lecturer, research associate, nursing educator, author, and developer of the science of unitary human beings, a conceptual model of nursing. She was a pioneer in the development of a body of knowledge that is specific and unique to nursing. This recognition of the need for an organized body of nursing knowledge was evident in her early writing on nursing education. Her goal was “to evolve a conceptual system that would give identity to nursing as a knowledgeable endeavor.”
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Rog·ers

(roj'ĕrz), Avoid the incorrect forms Roger and Roger's.
Oscar H., U.S. physician, 1857-1941. See: Rogers sphygmomanometer.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"Neither," she answered, "I be satisfied with my friend, Roger de Conde."
"A most unbridgeable gulf indeed," commented Roger de Conde, drily.
"One can never tell," said Roger de Conde, "what manner of fool a man may be.
On the other side of the house, old Roger Chillingworth arranged his study and laboratory: not such as a modern man of science would reckon even tolerably complete, but provided with a distilling apparatus and the means of compounding drugs and chemicals, which the practised alchemist knew well how to turn to purpose.
The people, in the case of which we speak, could justify its prejudice against Roger Chillingworth by no fact or argument worthy of serious refutation.
Arthur Dimmesdale, like many other personages of special sanctity, in all ages of the Christian world, was haunted either by Satan himself or Satan's emissary, in the guise of old Roger Chillingworth.
Uncle Roger says the drawing string has fell out of it.
"I know a story," said the Story Girl, "about Uncle Roger when he was just a young man.
"Uncle Roger says it would be no harm to worship him because he doesn't look like anything in the heavens above or on the earth beneath or the waters under the earth."
An almost superstitious regard, arising perhaps from the customs of the Indians, whose war was with the dead as well as the living, was paid by the frontier inhabitants to the rites of sepulture; and there are many instances of the sacrifice of life in the attempt to bury those who had fallen by the "sword of the wilderness." Reuben, therefore, felt the full importance of the promise which he most solemnly made to return and perform Roger Malvin's obsequies.
"It is enough," said Roger Malvin, having listened to Reuben's promise.
"Hold thy peace, Roger Williams!" answered Endicott, imperiously.