Rodney Dangerfield Syndrome

A popular term for the disparaging pall cast upon primary care specialties, who have traditionally not garnered the same respect as specialists
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"What we've been facing is jokingly what I would call the Rodney Dangerfield syndrome: We can't get any respect," said Bill Holda, the association's board chairman and Kilgore College president.
To be sure, this was no easy task: most practitioners were not interested in writing of their administrative experiences, and public administration was still fighting an uphill battle in academic circles to be recognized as respectable social science, or what one commentator calls the "Rodney Dangerfield syndrome." The editorial mission to encourage the Cross-fertilization of ideas and experiences within the growing public administration community was the stated goal, and a good beginning had been made by my predecessors in health policy (Taylor), aspects of administrative law (Abel, Dussault), fiscal federalism (Smiley, Bolduc), and ministerial responsibility and all its ethical implications (Kernaghan, Gelinas).