avalanche

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Related to Rock avalanche: Debris avalanche
Nuclear medicine Avalanche ionization
Wilderness medicine A natural disaster in which massive unsorted mixtures of snow/ice/rock/mud cascade down a steep incline. Powder snow avalanches can exceed speeds of 300 km/h, and masses of 10,000,000 tonnes
Statistics Europe, 150 deaths/year; USA/Canada, 15/year; most are recreational—e.g., snowmobilers, mountaineers, back-country skiers
Avalanche risks Decreased snow stability; slope angles > 35º
Emergency action Do not wait; even in well-equipped ski areas, helicopters take 45 minute to arrive
Survival 15 minutes—85%; 30 minutes—40%; 1 hour—20%; 2 hours—0%
Cause of death Crush injury, hypothermia, suffocation

avalanche

Geomedicine A natural disaster in which a massive block of snow cascades down a steep incline Statistics In North America, ± 15 die thereof/yr; in Europe, 150/yr; most are recreational deaths–eg, snowmobilers, mountaineers, backcountry skiers Avalanche risks ↓ Snow stability; slope angles > 35º COD Crush injury, asphyxia. See Geological disaster.
References in periodicals archive ?
A shear zone was discovered at the south boundary of the Hsien-du-shan rock avalanche [32].
Chen and Wu [20] calculated that the slid volume of the Hsien-du-shan rock avalanche was c.a.
To better understand the shear behavior of the sliding surface of the Hsien-du-shan rock avalanche, the interface between the sliding gouge and the Tangenshan sandstone is also investigated.
In this study, both methods were carried out on liquefaction features identified in two Quaternary (Pleistocene-Holocene) paleolake sequences resulting from the damming of the Acequion river due two ancient rock avalanches. Deformation structures occur close to an active Quaternary fault system located in the nearness.
Two rock avalanches dammed the Acequion river causing associated lakes.
London, Oct 16 (ANI): With climate change taking its toll on Earth, rock avalanches and landslides have become more common in high mountain ranges over the last decade.
In the Olympic mountains, geologists dated six prehistoric rock avalanches to between 1,000 and 1,300 years ago.