robertsonian translocation

(redirected from Robertsonian fusion)

translocation

 [trans″lo-ka´shun]
the attachment of a fragment of one chromosome to a nonhomologous chromosome.
Translocation of a portion of one chromosome to another chromosome. Redrawn from Damjanov, 2000.
reciprocal translocation the mutual exchange of fragments between two broken chromosomes, one part of one uniting with part of the other.
robertsonian translocation that in which the breaks occur at the centromeres and entire chromosome arms are exchanged, usually involving two acrocentric chromosomes.

ro·bert·so·ni·an trans·lo·ca·tion

translocation in which the centromeres of two acrocentric chromosomes appear to have fused, forming an abnormal chromosome consisting of the long arms of two different chromosomes with loss of the short arms. A carrier of a balanced robertsonian translocation has only 45 chromosomes but near normal chromosomal complement and a clinically normal phenotype; however, he or she is at risk of having a child with unbalanced chromosomal complement. A person with an unbalanced robertsonian translocation is trisomic for the long arm of the chromosome.
Synonym(s): centric fusion
[W.R.B. Robertson, U.S. geneticist.]

ro·bert·so·ni·an trans·lo·ca·tion

(rob'ĕrt-sō'nē-ăn tranz'lō-kā'shŭn)
Translocation in which the centromeres of two acrocentric chromosomes appear to have fused, forming an abnormal chromosome consisting of the long arms of two different chromosomes; if the translocation is balanced, the individual is clinically normal but a carrier of the translocation; if the translocation is unbalanced, the individual is trisomic for the long arm of a chromosome.
Synonym(s): centric fusion.
[W.R.B. Robertson, U.S. geneticist.]

Robertson,

W.R.B., U.S. geneticist, 1881–.
robertsonian translocation - translocation in which the centromeres of two acrocentric chromosomes appear to have fused, forming an abnormal chromosome. Synonym(s): centric fusion
References in periodicals archive ?
Alvarez, "A new Robertsonian fusion in the multiple chromosome polymorphism of a Mediterranean population of Gobius paganellus (Gobiidae, Perciformes)," Heredity, vol.
coeruleus) to high derived ones, originated by Robertsonian fusions in both A.
irradians may not be a selective advantage, but rather because of an evolutionary loss of telomeres through Robertsonian fusion and extensive chromosome arm loss.
This reduction in chromosome number may be because of Robertsonian fusion, wherein telocentric chromosomes fused, reducing the total chromosome number (Wang & Guo 2004).
Moreover, cytogenetic studies have reported high diploid and fundamental number for phyllotine species in the lowlands, such as in the genera Andalgalomys and Calomys (Bonvicino et al., 2003 and literature cited there; Olds et al., 1987), thus, contradicting the hypothesis of reduction of chromosome number by Robertsonian fusion in the taxa distributed outside the Andean plateau.
Robertsonian fusion and centric fission are unique in being readily identified in comparative karyotype studies since both result in concomitant changes in chromosome morphology and chromosome number.
These analyses have been performed with these characters ordered with and without polarity, that is, with and without the possibility of reversing a Robertsonian fusion.
Later, I discussed statispatry directly with Michael White; it was when I had caught those first house mice with a re-arranged karyotype due to Robertsonian fusions.
domesticus mice (2n = 34) from this region due to the presence of three centric or Robertsonian fusions, Rb(2.5), Rb(3.8), and Rb(6.9), whereas M.
Robertsonian fusions between X chromosomes and autosomes (X/A fusion) have occurred many times in the evolutionary history of South American Melanoplinae which exhibit an amazing diversity of neo-XY chromosome systems (Mesa et al.
After Robertsonian fusions take place (Saez 1963, White 1973), agradual process of heterochromatinization in the exhomologues begins.
In the majority of its range, this species has a karyotype consisting of 20 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes (2n = 40), but numerous races with differing sets of autosomal Robertsonian fusions have been found, particularly in central Europe (review: Bauchau 1990).