methylphenidate

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methylphenidate

 [meth″il-fenĭ-dāt]
a mild central nervous system stimulant; the hydrochloride salt is administered orally in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

methylphenidate

(mĕth′əl-fĕn′ĭ-dāt′, -fē′nĭ-)
n.
A drug, C14H19NO2, chemically related to amphetamine, that acts as a mild stimulant of the central nervous system and is used in its hydrochloride form to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

methylphenidate

An amphetamine-derived CNS stimulant.
 
Adverse effects
Decreased appetite—10–15% of children have major weight loss; insomnia—most suffer sleep delay; abdominal pain; headaches; dry mouth; dizziness; depression, tachycardia; a proposed link to decreased growth is uncertain.
 
Indications for
Hyperactivity, ADD, childhood narcolepsy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

methylphenidate

Ritalin® Neuropharmacology An amphetamine derived CNS stimulant used to control ADD and hyperactivity in children Adverse effects ↓ Appetite, 10-15% of children have major weight loss; insomnia–most suffer sleep delay, abdominal pain, headaches, dry mouth, dizziness, depression, tachycardia; link with ↓ growth is uncertain Used for Hyperactivity; narcolepsy; ADD. See Amphetamine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

methylphenidate

A nervous system stimulant drug that, paradoxically, has been found effective in the management of ATTENTION-DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER in children. A brand name is Ritalin. The current consensus of opinion on the use of this drug for this purpose is that it is grossly over-prescribed, especially in the USA.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005