safe sexual activity

(redirected from Risky sexual activities)
(1) Sexual activity engaged in by people who have taken precautions to protect themselves against sexually transmitted diseases such as AIDS
(2) Sexual activity based on guidelines on the relative safety of various sexual practices, in terms of the potential for transmitting infection, in particular HIV-1

safe sexual activity

Sexology A group of guidelines on the relative safeness of various sexual activities, in terms of the potential for transmitting infection, in particular HIV-1; these guidelines are of use in advising Pts. See Paraphilia, Sex industry, Sexual deviancy, Sexually transmitted disease.
Safe sex guidelines
Safe sexual activities Mutual masturbation–male or female, social kissing–dry, taking a bath together, body massage, hugging, body-to-body contact–frottage to orgasm of any external body part, light sado-masochistic activities–without bruising or bleeding, licking dry healthy skin
Risky sexual activities–insufficient data is available–should be considered with caution French–wet kissing, vaginal or anal intercourse with a condom, fellatio without ejaculation, fellatio interruptus or into condom, cunnilingus, urine contact–'water sports', ie urination on sexual partner, stimulation to orgasm between the thighs or buttocks, digital-anal sex without a barrier
Unsafe sexual activities–risk increases with multiple partners Vaginal or anal intercourse without a condom, manual-anal intercourse–'fisting', nonprotected oral-anal contact–anilingus, 'rimming', nonprotected manual-vaginal contact, fellatio totalis–oral-semen contact, swallowing menstrual blood, swallowing vaginal fluids, blood contact, sharing of sex toys
References in periodicals archive ?
The campaign is also aimed at raising awareness about the high risk behavioural activities related to alcohol abuse such as violence, risky sexual activities, and the spread of HIV/AIDS, says Davies.
Young people's involvement in risky sexual activities remains a concern in sub-Saharan Africa [11].
Numerous studies have demonstrated that individuals who pursue sexual partners through internet websites report significantly higher rates of sexual sensation seeking and risky sexual activities (Benotsch, Kalichman, & Cage, 2002; Grosskopf, Harris, Wallace, & Nanin, 2011; Grov et al., 2007).
Risky sexual behaviour can also take several forms, ranging from a large number of sexual partners, or engaging in risky sexual activities, to sexual intercourse under the influence of substances such as alcohol or cocaine.
(17) Studies have also shown that risky sexual activities such as multiple sexual partnerships and unprotected sex are not uncommon within this population.
(13) The research suggests that foreign birth and low acculturation are negatively associated with individuals' propensity to initiate sex early or engage in risky sexual activities. Yet, these studies have not yet clearly examined nativity differences in sexual behaviors that pose serious, deleterious health risk.
But data from these studies have shown that in most cases, this resistance was not brought on by concerns that the vaccination might make teenage girls more likely to engage in risky sexual activities.
Black adolescent girls who reported risky sexual activities scored significantly higher on tests of sexual sensation-seeking traits than did those who didn't report risky sex, based on data from 1,245 sexually active females aged 15-21 years.
Research assessing the ecological risk factor model has suggested that alcohol use, low academic achievement, risk behaviors among peers, a history of sexual abuse, and lack of parental supervision increase the probability of risky sexual activities in youth (Perkins et al., 1998).
In other words, the more a student engages in risky sexual activities, the more likely is the student to use condoms and/or ask for the sexual history of partners.
In addition, since most sexually active individuals practice oral sex in addition to other forms of sex, such as vaginal and/or anal sex, when transmission occurs, it is difficult to determine whether or not it occurred as a result of oral sex or other more risky sexual activities. Finally, several co-factors can increase the risk of HIV transmission through oral sex, including: oral ulcers, bleeding gums, genital sores, and the presence of other STDs.
Helping adolescents identify behavioral alternatives to risky sexual activities can contribute to reducing the pressure to choose sexual behavior that involves risk.