risk

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risk

 [risk]
a danger or hazard; the probability of suffering harm.
attributable risk the amount or proportion of incidence of disease or death (or risk of disease or death) in individuals exposed to a specific risk factor that can be attributed to exposure to that factor; the difference in the risk for unexposed versus exposed individuals.
empiric risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family based solely on experience rather than on knowledge of the causative mechanism. See also genetic risk.
genetic risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family, based on knowledge of its genetic pattern of transmission. See also empiric risk.
relative risk for a disease, death, or other outcome, the ratio of the incidence rate among individuals with a given risk factor to the incidence rate among those without it.

risk

(risk), In idiomatic English one is at risk of, not for, a disease, injury, or other untoward event. Avoid redundant phrases such a possible risk and potential risk; an element of uncertainty is inherent in the meaning of the word.
The probability that an event will occur.

risk

(rĭsk)
n.
The possibility of suffering harm or loss; danger.

risk′er n.

risk

EBM
In clinical trials, a term referring to the possibility of harm or discomfort for study participants.

risk

Epidemiology The chance or likelihood that an undesirable event or effect will occur, as a result of use or nonuse, incidence, or influence of a chemical, physical, or biologic agent, especially during a stated period; the probability of developing a given disease over a specified time period. See Minimal risk Managed care The chance or possibility of loss. See Risk sharing Occupational medicine A value determined by the potential severity of the hazard and the frequency of exposure to the 'risky' substance or activity, usually understood to mean the probability of suffering from a particular disease Risk assessment The probability that something will cause injury, combined with the potential severity of that injury. See Absolute risk, Acceptable risk, Assigned risk, Attributable risk, Cancer risk, Cardiac risk, Dread risk, Hazard risk rating, High risk/high impact, Incremental risk, Lifetime risk, No significant risk, Nonattributable risk, Thick conception of risk, Thin conception of risk, Unknown risk.
Risks of disease
Infection
HBV  1:63,000
HCV 1:103,000
HIV 1:493,000
HTLV I/II 1:641,000
HAV  1:1,000,000
Other morbid conditions
MVA 1:6,700
Flood 1:450,000
Earthquake 1:600,000
Lightning 1:1,000,000

risk

(risk)
1. The probability that an event will occur.
2. The possibility of adverse consequences.

risk

(risk)
Probability that an event will occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fine marshals the evidence on risk-taking from many studies, which demonstrate that risk-taking behavior is not only domain-specific--gamblers might buy life insurance; skydivers might never play the stock market--but also culture dependent.
When, the acquirer increases their risk-taking behavior it will favor the target firm to be more optimistic and to hold out for a better deal.
Benignly envious people perceived less risk when making risky decisions than did maliciously envious people; thus, the perception of risk mediated the effect of envy on risk-taking tendency.
The purpose of the present research was to investigate the extent to which mothers' personal characteristics and behaviors, specifically mothers' gender roles and parenting styles, were related to risk-taking by children between the ages of two years and five years.
If the idea of risk-taking still makes your palms sweat, try to increase your comfort level by taking a small risk before embarking on a bigger one.
These two studies further find that the influence of RBC regulatory pressure on the risk-taking behavior of the two bank groups appears asymmetric.
One way to overcome the limitations of self-report methods for assessing SRBs is to use laboratory methods that evoke risk-taking decisions in a real-time fashion that also control for as many extraneous variables as possible, maximize internal validity, and provide opportunities for experimental work that is not feasible using most self-report methods.
Nevertheless, given the recent concerns over excessive risk-taking in corporate America, even this lone drawback appears to have a bright side.
An important strand of the literature on risk-taking in tournaments examines the impact of revealed heterogeneity of agents on risk-taking (either right from the start of the tournament or at an intermediate stage).
Second, the parents with whom they work may fear criticism and accusations of poor or negligent parenting if they allow their children to engage in risk-taking activities.
Estimating Risk and Excessive Risk-Taking in Colombia's Commercial Banks
They reckon the different approach to risk-taking may be down to evolution - for survival, men needed to be risk-taking to establish status while women needed to avoid risks to take care of their children properly.