risk

(redirected from Risk premium)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Risk premium: Equity risk premium

risk

 [risk]
a danger or hazard; the probability of suffering harm.
attributable risk the amount or proportion of incidence of disease or death (or risk of disease or death) in individuals exposed to a specific risk factor that can be attributed to exposure to that factor; the difference in the risk for unexposed versus exposed individuals.
empiric risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family based solely on experience rather than on knowledge of the causative mechanism. See also genetic risk.
genetic risk the probability that a trait will occur or recur in a family, based on knowledge of its genetic pattern of transmission. See also empiric risk.
relative risk for a disease, death, or other outcome, the ratio of the incidence rate among individuals with a given risk factor to the incidence rate among those without it.

risk

(risk), In idiomatic English one is at risk of, not for, a disease, injury, or other untoward event. Avoid redundant phrases such a possible risk and potential risk; an element of uncertainty is inherent in the meaning of the word.
The probability that an event will occur.

risk

(rĭsk)
n.
The possibility of suffering harm or loss; danger.

risk′er n.

risk

EBM
In clinical trials, a term referring to the possibility of harm or discomfort for study participants.

risk

Epidemiology The chance or likelihood that an undesirable event or effect will occur, as a result of use or nonuse, incidence, or influence of a chemical, physical, or biologic agent, especially during a stated period; the probability of developing a given disease over a specified time period. See Minimal risk Managed care The chance or possibility of loss. See Risk sharing Occupational medicine A value determined by the potential severity of the hazard and the frequency of exposure to the 'risky' substance or activity, usually understood to mean the probability of suffering from a particular disease Risk assessment The probability that something will cause injury, combined with the potential severity of that injury. See Absolute risk, Acceptable risk, Assigned risk, Attributable risk, Cancer risk, Cardiac risk, Dread risk, Hazard risk rating, High risk/high impact, Incremental risk, Lifetime risk, No significant risk, Nonattributable risk, Thick conception of risk, Thin conception of risk, Unknown risk.
Risks of disease
Infection
HBV  1:63,000
HCV 1:103,000
HIV 1:493,000
HTLV I/II 1:641,000
HAV  1:1,000,000
Other morbid conditions
MVA 1:6,700
Flood 1:450,000
Earthquake 1:600,000
Lightning 1:1,000,000

risk

(risk)
1. The probability that an event will occur.
2. The possibility of adverse consequences.

risk

(risk)
Probability that an event will occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
This puts OPEC in a strong position to collect a risk premium in financial markets for insuring others against the macroeconomic effects of changes in the price of crude oil.
In the remainder of the article, we first define the downside risk premium and compare it with the monetary compensation proposed in Crainich and Eeckhoudt (2008).
Results from the previous section indicate that long term real rates in Brazil are mainly driven by US long term real rates and the risk premium, measured by the CDS spreads.
In this section, we initially provide information on how we are testing for capital market integration, a necessary condition for the economic relevance of a country risk premium. Then we test for the significance of a country risk premium directly, using regression methods with panel data.
As expected, consistent with the model-based estimate of r* the correlation between the term and risk premium and our natural rate factor is negative.
They considered the risk premium for a developed market and recommended taking the cost of debt in local currency, adding the "systematic part of the credit spread," which relates to the credit risk of the issuer with respect to the risk-free rate in U.S.
When all other managers exert more effort, this increases the precision of the performance measurement, thereby reducing the risk premium. In response, manager j can reduce his costly exertion of monitoring.
Figure 2 shows all combinations of risk-free rate Rf and risk premium E[R]-[R.sup.f] that are possible to obtain in the Mehra-Prescott model calibrated to the consumption growth pattern in the US economy (i.e.
Next, I present a model that captures deviations from UIP by introducing an endogenous risk premium on foreign-denominated assets.
Second, there is a thing such as compressed risk premiums, which in ordinary English simply means investors are becoming reckless, or complacent, or simply daft.
For public investment decision-making in Saudi Arabia, this raises the question of the risk premium associated with the crude oil price.