rinderpest

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Related to Rinderpest virus: Nipah virus

rinderpest

(rĭn′dər-pĕst′)
n.
An acute, often fatal, contagious viral disease, chiefly of cattle, characterized by ulceration of the alimentary tract and resulting in diarrhea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protection of goats against peste des petits ruminants with recombinant capripoxviruses expressing the fusion and haemagglutinin protein genes of rinderpest virus. Vaccine 1995; 13: 36-40.
Countries were required to answer an introductory question: "Does your country currently hold rinderpest virus-containing material?" Only 1 of 4 predetermined options could be selected: "yes," "no," "unknown," or "never held rinderpest virus-containing material." Responders who answered "yes" were asked to provide further information, including details about the nature and quantity of rinderpest virus held, the name and address of the facility where it was held, and the biosafety/biocontainment level of the facility.
As of June 2015, the survey response rate was 100%, indicating that all OIE Member Countries had fulfilled their obligation to report on remaining stocks of rinderpest virus. Four years after the declaration of global freedom, rinderpest material remains stored in at least 27 facilities in 24 countries.
Characterization of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes on the carboxy terminus of the rinderpest virus nucleocapsid protein.
Vaccination of cattle with attenuated rinderpest virus stimulates CD4(+) T cell responses with broad viral antigen specificity.
Origin of measles virus: divergence from rinderpest virus between the 11th and 12th centuries.
Although participatory surveillance was essential in assessing the levels and effect of cattle vaccination (10), wildlife serosurveillance was the primary tool for detecting the presence or absence of circulating rinderpest virus in the final stages of the eradication process (11).
We conducted a questionnaire survey to assess the location and number of rinderpest virus stocks, their uses, and their storage conditions.
It was complemented with the results of a previous questionnaire survey undertaken during 2010 by the FAO and OIE to identify countries holding rinderpest virus stocks and with information obtained from unpublished, or "grey," literature and direct discussions with laboratory staff.
Although rinderpest virus was eradicated after intensive vaccination campaigns in the last quarter of the 20th century (6), PPRV has continued to spread in Africa and Asia.
The virus is present in Africa (1-3), the Middle East (4), the Arabian Peninsula (5), and southern Asia (6,7) and is closely related to Rinderpest virus (RPV), Canine distemper virus, and human measles virus (8).