rigor

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rigor

 [rig´or, ri´gor]
1. a chill; rigidity.
2. strict discipline or scrupulous adherence to a given set of standards.
rigor mor´tis the stiffening of a dead body accompanying depletion of adenosine triphosphate in the muscle fibers.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē),
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
See also: nuchal rigidity. Synonym(s): rigor (1)
2. In psychiatry and clinical psychology, an aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
3. In neurology, one type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and lead-pipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity.
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

rigor

(rĭg′ər)
n.
1.
a. Strictness or severity, as in action or judgment: "The desert fostered a closed world of faith and rigor and harsh judgment: almost every decision here could have lethal consequences" (Jeffrey Tayler).
b. A harsh or trying circumstance; a hardship or difficulty: the rigors of working in a coal mine.
c. Archaic A harsh or severe act.
2.
a. Strictness in adhering to standards or a method; exactitude: "To study the brain with scientific rigor, behaviorists logically restricted their experiments to ones in which the brain was the source of measurable effects" (Robert Pollack).
b. A standard or exacting requirement, as of a field of study: the intellectual rigors of advanced mathematics.
3. Medicine Shivering or trembling, as caused by a chill.
4. Physiology A state of rigidity in living tissues or organs that prevents response to stimuli.
5. Obsolete Stiffness or rigidity.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Stiffness of a cadaver. The following are crude approximations of the time of death, based on temperature and presence/absence of rigor
warm and flaccid < 3 hours
warm and stiff 3-8 hours
cold and stiff 8-36 hours
cold and flaccid > 36 hours
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

chill

(chil)
1. A sensation of cold.
2. A feeling of cold with shivering and pallor, accompanied by an elevation of temperature in the interior of the body; usually a prodromal symptom of an infectious disease due to the presence in the blood of foreign protein or toxins.
Synonym(s): rigor (2) .
[A.S. cele, cold]

ri·gid·i·ty

(ri-jid'i-tē)
1. Stiffness or inflexibility.
Synonym(s): rigor (1) .
2. psychiatry, clinical psychology An aspect of personality characterized by a person's resistance to change.
3. neurology One type of increase in muscle tone at rest; characterized by increased resistance to passive stretch, independent of velocity and symmetric about joints; increases with activation of corresponding muscles in the contralateral limb. Two basic types are cogwheel rigidity and leadpipe rigidity.
See also: nuchal rigidity
[L. rigidus, rigid, inflexible]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

rigor

A violent attack of shivering causing a rapid rise in body temperature.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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The reactive resin solution crosslinks and cures on the mold surface, and is said to offer a durable release coating that withstands the abrasion of highly filled resins and the rigors of solid surface processing.
The reactive resin solution crosslinks and cures on the mold surface, offering a durable release coating that withstands the abrasion of highly filled resins and the rigors of solid surface processing, according to the manufacturer.
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