Right to Treatment


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.
Related to Right to Treatment: right to refuse treatment
The doctrine that a facility is legally obliged to provide adequate treatment for a person once it has assumed the responsibility of providing treatment
References in periodicals archive ?
At the initial 1971 hearing, the State of Alabama admitted that patients involuntarily committed to state mental health institutions had a constitutional right to treatment. (12) Such a concession was surprising, because this issue had been in no way settled.
Prisons are the only place in this country where people have the right to treatment. If only health care reform could replicate this outside of prison.
WORCESTER - The need for state hospitals to provide a safety net for the sickest people with mental illness clashed yesterday with the right to treatment in the least restrictive and most dignified surroundings.
Alcoholics have a right to treatment just as much as somebody who is physically unwell, some of these people may be homeless and had dreadful life experiences.
The law recognizes that children who are victims of abuse, violence, neglect, injury, maltreatment and exploitation, including sexual abuse and exploitation, have the right to treatment and rehabilitation, according to UNICEF.
Among the issues she discusses are whether there is a right to treatment, treating incompetent patients, pregnancy and freedom of choice, and assisted dying.
He said: "Everyone has a right to treatment and it can only be stopped if it is not in their interests.
The move pits health and public-safety officials against one another as they try to balance the patient's right to treatment with the neighborhood's right to safety.
"The Council thus ignores the inherent right to life of all babies, disabled or not, as well as the right to treatment on an individual basis according to clinical need."
John said: "Surely having paid into the NHS for more than 50 years I have a right to treatment. It's not as if I've ignored warnings and smoked right up until I was diagnosed."
"We are failing children," said Dean Hirsch, chairman of the lobal Movement for Children, which issued an urgent appeal to governments and the pharmaceutical industry to recogise a child's right to treatment.
And so, while Eileen lies trapped in her bed, her life hanging in the balance, the doctors whose job it is to care for her and the family who love her unconditionally are embroiled in a bitter battle which will see them debating in court Eileen's right to treatment.