subclavian artery

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Related to Right subclavian: arteria subclavia

sub·cla·vi·an ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, right from brachiocephalic, left from arch of aorta; branches, vertebral, thyrocervical trunk, internal thoracic; costocervical trunk, descending scapular; it continues as the axillary artery after crossing the first rib.
Synonym(s): arteria subclavia [TA]

subclavian artery

n.
A part of a major artery of the upper extremities or forelimbs that passes beneath the clavicle and is continuous with the axillary artery.

subclavian artery

one of a pair of arteries passing under the clavicle that vary in origin, course, and the height to which they rise in the neck but have six similar main branches supplying the vertebral column, spinal cord, ear, and brain. See also left subclavian artery, right subclavian artery.

sub·cla·vi·an ar·te·ry

(sŭb-klā'vē-ăn ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, right from brachiocephalic, left from arch of aorta; branches, vertebral, thyrocervical trunk, internal thoracic; costocervical trunk, descending scapular; it continues as the axillary artery after crossing the first rib.
Synonym(s): arteria subclavia [TA] .

subclavian artery

A short length of the major artery that branches from the aorta on the left side and from the innominate artery on the right side and continues as the axillary artery to supply the arm. The subclavian arteries also supply the brain via their vertebral branches.
References in periodicals archive ?
Embryologically, the normal right subclavian artery originates from the right fourth branchial arch.
Aberrant right subclavian artery associated with a common origin of carotid arteries.
In the literature, there have been few cases of ascending aortic dissections presenting with STEMI complicating right subclavian artery occlusion (10).
Congenital right subclavian artery aneurysm: a case report.
However, the line looped in the right subclavian artery and did not fully extend to the superior vena cava.
Morros attempted to insert the Permacath into the patient's right subclavian vein.
The left ventricle and all vessels that come off the heart before the obstruction--which usually include the right subclavian artery and head vessels--become hypertensive.
Therefore, an abnormal origin of the right subclavian artery (aberrant right subclavian artery [ARSA]) was suspected.
Triplex color doppler study revealed complete thrombosis of right internal jugular vein, right proximal brachiocephalic vein with partial thrombosis in right subclavian vein.
The tip of the PICC was within the right subclavian artery.