Rift Valley fever


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Rift Valley fever

 
a zoonotic febrile disease with symptoms like those of dengue, due to an arbovirus transmitted by mosquitoes or by contact with diseased animals; first observed in the Rift Valley, Kenya.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Rift Val·ley fe·ver

a fatal endemic disease of sheep, caused by Rift Valley fever virus, a member of the family Bunyaviridae, which is also pathogenic for humans and cattle, producing in humans fever of an undifferentiated type; transmitted by mosquitoes and direct contact.
[Rift Valley in Kenya]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Rift Valley fever

n.
An acute infectious disease of humans and domestic animals, especially cattle and sheep, caused by a mosquito-borne virus and characterized in humans by fever and sometimes ocular disease, hemorrhagic symptoms, or encephalitis, and in animals by fever, abortion, and death of newborns. Rift Valley fever was first described in Kenya and occurs primarily in sub-Saharan Africa.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Rift valley fever

Infectious disease A dengue-like viral disease spread by mosquitoes in floods, causing fatal enzootic hepatitis in ruminants–sheep, cattle and occasional human epidemics, by direct contact Clinical Abrupt onset with a biphasic fever curve, headaches, prostration, myalgias, anorexia, N&V, conjunctivitis, lymphadenopathy; death may result from hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis Mortality 5-20%. See Dengue.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Rift Valley fever

A disease occurring mainly in South Africa and caused by an arbovirus normally infecting sheep and goats. It is transmitted by mosquito bite and causes a DENGUE-like illness sometimes complicated by JAUNDICE, haemorrhages, RETINOPATHY and MENINGOENCEPHALITIS. There is no specific treatment.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of techniques for demonstrating antibodies to Rift Valley fever virus.
Complete genome analysis of 33 ecologically and biologically diverse Rift Valley fever virus strains reveals widespread virus movement and low genetic diversity due to recent common ancestry.
Such coordination was found to have worked very effectively in Saudi Arabia during the huge outbreak of Rift Valley fever in 2000.
Bailey, "Rift Valley fever," in The Arboviruses: Epidemiology and Ecology, T.
The serum samples were analyzed using the inhibition enzyme-linked immunoassay kit for the detection of antibody (both IgG and IgM) to Rift Valley fever virus in humans and domestic and wild ruminants (Special Pathogens Unit, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, South Africa) [26].
The only two arbovirus infections for which a human vaccine is available are yellow fever and Rift Valley fever. The yellow fever vaccine is highly effective and, in terms of the International Health Regulations, travellers from areas deemed by the World Health Organization to be endemic for yellow fever must be vaccinated against the disease.
Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis endemic to Africa (1) that primarily affects domestic ruminants, causing large epizootics with high mortality rates in young animals and abortions.
There were concerns regarding a possible outbreak of Rift Valley Fever, a livestock disease that killed 26 people and 8,500 animals in the country last year.
However, they refused, demanding that the Yemeni government provide a certificate stating Yemen is free of rift valley fever," said Mansoor Al-Qadasi, Director of the Animal Health Department at the Ministry of Agriculture.
Jeffrey Lockwood, professor of entomology at Wyoming University and author of Six-legged Soldiers: Using Insects as Weapons of War, said such Rift Valley Fever or other diseases could be transported into a country by a terrorist with a suitcase.
Forty-seven international academics and researchers contribute 20 chapters providing concise and timely updates on the epidemiology, clinical features, and prevention and control strategies for a number of important emerging and reemerging infectious diseases and syndromes, including non-SARS coronaviruses, human bocavirus, norovirus gastroenteritis, new human parechoviruses, adenoviral infections in transplant recipients, Japanese encephalitis, chikungunya virus, lyssa viruses, Hendra and Nipah viruses, Rift Valley fever, Streptococcus suis, Staphylococcus aureus, pertussis, salmonellosis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Clostridium difficile, drug-resistant tuberculosis, immune reconstitutions inflammatory syndrome, and non-albicans Candida.