Strauss

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Strauss

(strows),
Lotte, 20th-century U.S. pathologist. See: Churg-Strauss syndrome.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Richard Strauss (1864-1949) was the most prolific German composer of his time, having composed a dozen symphonic works, fifteen operas, over two hundred songs, numerous pieces for woodwinds, concert overtures, concertos, ballet music, chamber music, and even film music.
Critique: A brilliant and extraordinarily well written overview of the life and accomplishments of the man dubbed by his peers as the 'King of Waltzes', "Richard Strauss: An Owner's Manual" by music critic, author, percussionist, and music review magazine journalist David Hurwitz should be considered a mandatory read by students of Richard Strauss musical heritage and will prove to be a valued and enduringly popular addition to academic library Music History & Heritage reference collections and supplemental reading lists.
The 150th birthday (2014) and 70th death anniversary (2019) of Richard Strauss are rapidly approaching.
Richard Strauss studies are now, as Rodgers and Hammerstein said about June, "bustin' out all over." Among those of us who experienced Australian campuses during the 1980s--when Strauss, like Puccini and Rachmaninoff, would never be cited save with disdain--the man's newfound scholarly respectability seems well-nigh incredible, and a fitting occasion for heartfelt sighs of Nunc Dimittis.
(Interested readers might follow the links for Wilhelm Furtwangler's version of Tannhauser and Richard Strauss' own version of the "Dance of the Seven Veils" from Salome).
"Lactinol HX is available without a prescription, which will provide podiatric patients with the trusted Lactinol quality without the concerns of drug formulary coverage and costly co-pays," comments PEDiNOL president Richard Strauss.
The series begins on October 11, at Madinat Jumeirah here, with soprano Karita Mattila taking centre stage in Richard Strauss' Salome.
Following his writing a succession of popular, big-scale tone poems like Don Juan, Tod und Verklarung (Death and Transfiguration), Don Quixote, Ein Heldenleben (A Hero's Life), and Also sprach Zarathustra, Richard Strauss ended his love affair with the genre in 1915 with An Alpine Symphony.
Her leading roles, ranging from Elvira in Mozart's "Don Giovanni" to the Marschallin in Richard Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier," were immortalized on records and CDs.
Schwarzkopf's noble bearing was another asset, especially in her signature role, the Marschallin in Richard Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier." She was almost equally dominant in Mozart's operas, setting standards for the Countess in "The Marriage of Figaro," Donna Elvira in "Don Giovanni" and Fiordiligi in "Cosi fan Tutte." Though the soprano's detractors pointed to an arch quality in her interpretations, her recordings of all these works remain in print and continue to top recommendations lists.
In Just Before Spring in the Year 2002, a shot of a baby's face is decelerated and paired with Holst's "Uranus: The Magician." Watching the infant open his eyes and move his facial muscles is as complete a transcription of the mechanics of absorption as one could imagine, and the work is the closest that Fandell gets to that of Stanley Kubrick, whose similar use of a child and Richard Strauss's Also sprach Zarathustra (1896) in his cinematic masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) seems also set on joining visual enchantment to musical delight.