Rhodococcus


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Rhodococcus

(rō'dō-kok'ŭs),
A genus of rod-shaped, gram-positive, partially acid-fast, aerobic bacteria found in soil and in the feces of herbivores. Some species are pathogenic for animals and humans. The type species is Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

Rho·do·coc·cus

(rō'dō-kok'ŭs)
A genus of rod-shaped, gram-positive, partially acid-fast, aerobic bacteria found in soil and in the feces of herbivores. Some species are pathogenic for animals and humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
2006), Tsukamurella (previously distributed among Rhodococcus and Corynebacterium species, Finnerty 1992, Erdlenbruch et al.
Rhodococcus equi infections have ranged from necrotizing pneumonia, to "wound infections, subcutaneous abscess, thyroid abscess, retroperitoneal abscess, peritonitis, osteomyelitis, endophthalmitis, lymphadenitis, lymphangitis, septic arthritis, osteitis, bloody diarrhea, and fever of unknown origin among others." (7)
One mystery still to be solved is why Rhodococcus started producing this antibiotic.
Their findings, part of a study led by The University of British Columbia researcher Lindsay Eltis, were included in a Rhodococcus genome paper published in last October's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
All four legs were ulcerated and runny with discharge, she also had pneumonia associated with Rhodococcus infection and was weak, off her food, and had ulcers in her mouth.
Li et al., "Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by bacterium Rhodococcus sp.
Most of the actinobacteria isolated were of the genus Streptomyces, and only two isolates were identified as Rhodococcus sp.
Rhodococcus equi (previously known as Corynebacterium equi) is a gram positive, obligately aerobic, intracellular coccobacillus that establishes itself in macrophages by interfering lysophagosomal fusion and multiplies within macrophages; lead to formation of granulomas and eventually necrosis (Prescott, 1991).
Some cultures took longer because of the need to rule out other organisms such as Corynebacterium spp., Chryseobacterium spp., Enterococcus spp., Rhodococcus spp., and Bacillus spp.
Plant pathogens included Rhodococcus fascians ATCC 12974, Curtobacterium flaccumfacienspathovar oortii ATCC 25283, and Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola ATCC 19304, and the saprophyte used was Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581.
proposed the new classification of genus Dietzia in 1995, and they suggested that Rhodococcus maris should be reclassified into a new genus, Dietzia [12].