rhizoid

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rhizoid

 [ri´zoid]
resembling a root.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd),
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. mycology the rootlike hyphae of fungi that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

(rī′zoid′)
n.
A slender rootlike filament that grows from an alga, a fungus, or the gametophyte of a moss, liverwort, or fern, used for attachment and nourishment.

rhi′zoid′, rhi·zoi′dal (-zoid′l) adj.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd)
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. In fungi, the rootlike hyphae that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

a hairlike structure that functions as a root in lower organisms such as certain fungi and mosses. Rhizoids are important in penetrating a substance, giving anchorage and absorbing nutrients.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Principal branches 50-90 [micro]m in diam., with segments 65-115 [micro]m long, fixed to substratum by a unicellular rhizoid 50 [micro]m in diam.
The jar (Figure 2a) was filled six times, being dredged among the floating and submersed macrophytes and their rhizoids. Each time, the collected water was filtered through the CETEC/SAA plankton net (20 [micro]m pore mesh).
Plants are attached to the substratum by means of rhizoids. They are long, slender and brown in colour.
Rhizoids in tufts on back of leaves, specially at leaf apices, brown, scarcely branched, smooth, frequent.
In testing the viability of the rhizoids after aboveground parts of the plant have been killed, Anderson is collaborating with Susan Williams, director of the University of California at Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory, just north of San Francisco.
The features that are most useful for distinguishing among Mucorales are the presence of the rhizoids, the shape of sporangium, the length of sporangiophore, and the shape of columella, the presence or absence of apophysis and collarette, and the organization and branching of stolons (3-12).
Underleaves are absent or very small and rhizoids are usually few, originating scattered from the ventral stem surface.
The sporangiophores are unbranched; arise singly or in groups with well-developed rhizoids at the base.
Megaspores showing at least one globular green structure with a crown of rhizoids were considered as germinated.
It is attached to the substrate by a stolon with rhizoids with finger-shaped extremities (specialized hapteroid cells) oriented horizontally, pale or lightly colored.
Caulerpa cupressoides (Figure 1A) is characterized by a creeping axis fixed to the substrate by rhizoids pinnules arranged in the opposite direction, endowed with erect shoots (assimilative) pine tree-shaped distributed around the main axis (TRI, 2009).