Rhipicephalus

(redirected from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus)

Rhipicephalus

(rī'pi-sef'ă-lŭs),
A genus of inornate hard ticks (family Ixodidae) consisting of about 50 species, all of which are Old World except Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Eyes and festoons are present in both sexes; short palpi and ventral plates are present only in the male. The genus includes important vectors of disease in humans and domestic animals.
[G. rhipis, fan, + kephalē, head]

Rhipicephalus

(rī″pĭ-sĕf′ă-lŭs) [Gr. rhipis, fan, + kephale, head]
A genus of ticks belonging to the family Ixodidae. Several species, esp. R. sanguineus, are vectors for the organisms of spotted fever, boutonneuse fever, and other rickettsial diseases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kang A et al., "Genes transcribed in the salivary glands of female Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks infected with Theileria parva," Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, vol.
Berkvens, "Survival of unfed Rhipicephalus appendiculatus and Rhipicephalus zambeziensis adults," Medical and Veterinary Entomology, vol.
Salivary gland extract of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks inhibits in vitro transcription and secretion of cytokines and production of nitric oxide by LPS stimulated JA-4 cells.
gynandra [120] have been demonstrated to contain essential oils which have repellent components against Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. Various tribes in Kenya have traditionally used different plant-derived materials to control ticks.
The establishment of three cell lines from the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (Acari: Ixodidae) and their infection with some arboviruses.
These tick-borne diseases include, but are not limited to, heartwater disease (Ehrlichia ruminantium) transmitted by Amblyomma hebraeum (bont tick); red water disease (Babesia bigemina) transmitted by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus (blue tick); and East coast fever (Theileria parva parva) and corridor disease (Theileria parva lawrencei) transmitted by Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (brown ear tick).
Negative controls consisted of DNA from 2 male and female laboratory-reared Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks and distilled water.
Salivery gland extract of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks inhibits in Vitro transcription and secretion of cytokines and production of nitric oxide by LPS stimulated JA-4 cells.
Al respecto, se ha senalado que los habitats adecuados para la garrapata Rhipicephalus appendiculatus podrian desaparecer de la parte sur de Zimbabwe y Mozambique, y se trasladarian hacia las partes centrales y occidentales del sur del continente africano (27).