Rhipicephalus

(redirected from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus)

Rhipicephalus

(rī'pi-sef'ă-lŭs),
A genus of inornate hard ticks (family Ixodidae) consisting of about 50 species, all of which are Old World except Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Eyes and festoons are present in both sexes; short palpi and ventral plates are present only in the male. The genus includes important vectors of disease in humans and domestic animals.
[G. rhipis, fan, + kephalē, head]

Rhipicephalus

/Rhi·pi·ceph·a·lus/ (ri″pĭ-sef´ah-lus) a genus of cattle ticks, many species of which transmit disease-producing organisms, such as Babesia ovis, B. canis, Rickettsia rickettsii, and R. conorii.

Rhipicephalus

(rī″pĭ-sĕf′ă-lŭs) [Gr. rhipis, fan, + kephale, head]
A genus of ticks belonging to the family Ixodidae. Several species, esp. R. sanguineus, are vectors for the organisms of spotted fever, boutonneuse fever, and other rickettsial diseases.

Rhipicephalus

a genus of ticks in the family Ixodidae.

Rhipicephalus appendiculatus
a three-host tick found on most animal species. Called also brown ear tick. Transmits Theileria parva, Babesia spp. and other protozoan and viral diseases including Nairobi sheep disease and louping ill. It is the principal vector of East Coast fever.
Rhipicephalus ayrei
transmits Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus bursa
transmits Babesia, Theileria, Anaplasma, Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Coxiella spp.
Rhipicephalus capensis
a three-host tick, parasitic on cattle; transmits East Coast fever.
Rhipicephalus evertsi
a two-host tick; transmits Theileria, Babesia, Borrelia, Rickettsia spp. Called also red-legged tick.
Rhipicephalus jeanelli
transmits Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus neavei
transmits Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus pulchellus
transmits Nairobi sheep disease virus and Theileria parva.
Rhipicephalus sanguineus
a three-host tick, mainly a parasite of dogs but occurs on all species of mammals and birds. It transmits Babesia, Borrelia, Coxiella, Rickettsia, Anaplasma and Pasteurella spp. Also causes tick paralysis.
Rhipicephalus simus
a three-host tick that transmits Theileria parva.
References in periodicals archive ?
Salivary gland extract of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks inhibits in vitro transcription and secretion of cytokines and production of nitric oxide by LPS stimulated JA-4 cells.
These tick-borne diseases include, but are not limited to, heartwater disease (Ehrlichia ruminantium) transmitted by Amblyomma hebraeum (bont tick); red water disease (Babesia bigemina) transmitted by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus (blue tick); and East coast fever (Theileria parva parva) and corridor disease (Theileria parva lawrencei) transmitted by Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (brown ear tick).
Negative controls consisted of DNA from 2 male and female laboratory-reared Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks and distilled water.
Salivery gland extract of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks inhibits in Vitro transcription and secretion of cytokines and production of nitric oxide by LPS stimulated JA-4 cells.
Este efecto ha sido evaluado en la garrapata Boophilus microplus y Rhipicephalus appendiculatus en ensayos realizados en parcelas y laboratorio, a traves de la presencia de un compuesto quimico volatil como posible responsable del efecto repelente, donde se cree necesario realizar investigacion del efecto del pasto Gordura sobre la garrapata A.
Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of cDNAs encoding for Boophilus microplus, Haemaphysalis longicornis and Rhipicephalus appendiculatus actins.
Al respecto, se ha senalado que los habitats adecuados para la garrapata Rhipicephalus appendiculatus podrian desaparecer de la parte sur de Zimbabwe y Mozambique, y se trasladarian hacia las partes centrales y occidentales del sur del continente africano (27).
Virus transmission is mainly through the bite of infected Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks though a large number of other Ixodid ticks are involved in the maintenance of the virus in nature.
Comparison of preservation methods of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (Acari: Ixodidae) for reliable DNA amplification by PCR.
Studies have also shown that insects like Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (Hassan et al.
aeschlimannii has also been found in a Rhipicephalus appendiculatus tick attached to the right thigh of a patient in South Africa (3).