Rh-negative


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Related to Rh-negative: rhesus factor, Rh factor, Rh positive

Rh-negative

(är′āch-nĕg′ə-tĭv)
adj.
Lacking an Rh factor.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In males, blood group AB and Rh-negative participants have shown the highest propensity of increased BFP (>21%) and WHR (>0.9).
If you are Rh-negative and your baby is Rh-positive, you may react to these "foreign" invaders as if you were allergic to them, building up antibodies capable of destroying the baby's red blood cells.
The proportion of Rh-negative women was similar among other controls, including 15.2% among all patients at the university hospital whose blood was typed between April 1, 2005, and March 31, 2006, and 17.7% among blood donors at the Missouri Illinois Regional Red Cross in calendar year 2005, they reported.
They found that women who had had lower abdominal pain or vaginal bleeding in the 24 hours before receiving the misoprostol had elevated odds of successful treatment (odds ratios, 3.1 and 1.8, respectively), as did those who were Rh-negative (5.6) and those who had never given birth (2.3).
To prevent complications, women who are Rh-negative who have had an Rh-positive baby should receive an injection of "Rh-immunoglobulin" within 72 hours after giving birth, having an abortion or miscarrying.
Humans either possess it and are Rh-positive, or they do not possess it and are thus Rh-negative. Rh-negative individuals may develop antibodies to the Rh factor if they are exposed to Rh-positive cells through transfusion or if cells from an Rh-positive fetus cross the placenta into an Rh-negative mother.
Mixing Rh-positive blood with Rh-negative blood can be dangerous.
Complete blood exchange transfusions of newborn babies with Rh-negative blood incompatibility were already being done in North America.
Rh incompatibility is less of a problem for the blood supply because about 84 percent of Americans are Rh-positive and even someone who is Rh-negative can withstand one accidental infusion of Rh-positive blood without having a severe reaction.
People who have the protein on their red blood cells are deemed Rh-positive; those who don't are Rh-negative.
The mothers were Rh-negative, but the fathers were Rh-positive, which was genetically dominant, so that their offspring were Rh-positive also.
One fetal cell per 1000 maternal cells represents a 5-mL hemorrhage, assuming a maternal blood volume of 5 L.[14] As few as 1 to 3 fetal cells per 500,000 maternal cells may sensitize up to 70% of Rh-negative women.