reward

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re·in·forc·er

, positive reinforcernegative reinforcer (rē'in-fōrs'ĕr),
In conditioning, a pleasant or satisfaction-yielding (positive reinforcer) or painful or unsatisfying (negative reinforcer), stimulus, object, or stimulus event that is obtained on the performance of a desired or predetermined operant.
See also: reinforcement (3).
Synonym(s): reward
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

reward

(rĭ-wôrd′)
n.
Psychology The return for performance of a desired behavior; positive reinforcement.
tr.v. re·warded, re·warding, re·wards
To give a reward to or for.

re·ward′a·ble adj.
re·ward′er n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

re·in·for·cer

, positive reinforcer , negative reinforcer (rē'in-fōrs'ĕr, pozi-tiv, negă-tiv)
In conditioning, a pleasant or satisfaction-yielding (positive reinforcer) or painful or unsatisfying (negative reinforcer) stimulus, object, or stimulus event that is obtained upon the performance of a desired or predetermined operant.
See also: reinforcement (3)
Synonym(s): reward.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite evidence that pollinators in deceit pollination systems can discriminate against rewardless female flowers, few studies have quantified both the degree of discrimination and the effect of pollinator discrimination on female reproductive success (Agren et al.
These levels of discrimination against the rewardless female flowers are comparable to those that have been observed in other insect-pollinated Begonia species (Agren and Schemske 1991, Schemske et al.
On the one hand, rewardless female flowers may face a lower risk of discrimination by pollinators, and therefore a higher visitation rate, if they bear a close resemblance to the male phenotype that pollinators encounter most often.
The tropical genus Begonia comprises predominantly monoecious species in which the rewardless female flowers often bear a striking resemblance to the polleniferous male flowers (Agren and Schemske 1991; Schemske et al.
The rewardless orchid Anacamptis morio (L.) was found to have higher visitation of its queen bumble bee pollinators when growing with magnet flowers with nectar rewards (Johnson et al., 2003).
rewardless flowers received fewer within-plant visits and thereby