revolving door syndrome


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Psychiatry A cyclical pattern of short-term readmissions to the psychiatric units of health care centres by young adults with chronic psychiatric disorders
Social medicine A general term for the lack of permanent jobs and homes typical of underskilled labourers or foreigners without permanent visas who emigrate to large cities and have a compromised quality of life

revolving door 'syndrome'

Psychiatry A cyclical pattern of short-term readmissions to the psychiatric units of health care centers by young adults with chronic psychiatric disorders. See Commitment, Homeless(ness) Social medicine A general term for the lack of permanent jobs and homes typical of underskilled laborers or foreigners without permanent visas who emigrate to large cities and have a compromised quality of life.
References in periodicals archive ?
The revolving door syndrome. (Ayotte 2006:19, my emphasis)
Here the subject is diagnosed with revolving door syndrome. The subject is characterized by resistance to treatment, lacks insight into its own condition, and poses a potential risk to self and society.
Some individuals with serious mental disorders are caught in what we call the revolving door syndrome. They are admitted to hospital when they meet the criteria for involuntary admission, but then they're subsequently discharged when they're stabilized and no longer meet those criteria.
"But, more importantly, we have to give a guaranteed period of work so that we can end the revolving door syndrome."
And he will call for hard-to-place j obseekers to be supported by welfare advisers for three years after finding work, in order to counter the "revolving door syndrome" which sees many back on the dole after only a short period of employment.
Justice Minister John O'Donoghue said it would end for once and for all the "revolving door syndrome" of prisoners being released because there was nowhere to keep them.
"It may be that decriminalisation would be the first step towards improvement, thus removing the revolving door syndrome of debt payment and fines from the courts."
Of particular concern has been what has become known as 'revolving door syndrome', whereby local authorities become increasingly cut-throat in trying to lure a dwindling pool of social workers.
"It's the revolving door syndrome - we have 60 places in Mountjoy and 25 in Limerick so we have to let women prisoners out on temporary release to make room for others."
Turnover rates are currently running at 15% in Wales as a result of this revolving door syndrome and as social workers leave the profession altogether.