muscle dysmorphia

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Related to Reverse anorexia: Reverse anorexia nervosa
A specific type of body dysmorphic disorder in which a person—usually male, average age 20—becomes obsessed with building muscle to the point where it impacts on his/her interactions with others, employment and his self-image. It is regarded as a treatment-resistant mental disorder, which typically occurs in bodybuilders who, while very muscular and physically fit, see a '97-pound weakling' in the mirror
Risk factors Bullying during primary, secondary school, family dysfunction, perfectionism, severe stress, aesthetic focus and negative influence of mass culture that promotes an idealised Arnold Schwarzenegger-type body
Management Antidepressants

muscle dysmorphia

Sports medicine A mental disorder seen in bodybuilders who, although very muscular and physically fit, still see the proverbial “90-pound weakling” when viewing themselves in the mirror Management Antidepressants. Cf Anorexia nervosa.

muscle dysmorphia

, muscle dysmorphic disorder
A body image disorder principally experienced by males, characterized by excessive fear about one's body size, esp. a concern that one's muscles are not large enough. Boys affected by muscle dysmorphia often take drugs, e.g., androgenic or anabolic steroids, to increase their body size. The syndrome is also known colloquially as bigorexia or vigorexia.
Synonym: reverse anorexia See: body dysmorphic disorder

Muscle dysmorphia

A subtype of BDD, described as excessive preoccupation with muscularity and body building to the point of interference with social, educational, or occupational functioning.
References in periodicals archive ?
A preliminary investigation into the relationship between anabolic-androgenic steroid use and the symptoms of reverse anorexia in both current and ex-users.
But when a boy with reverse anorexia looks at his reflection he is worried he is too thin and longs to build up his bulk.
ANOREXIA athletica, or reverse anorexia nervosa as it is also known, is a problem for many athletes, according to nutrition experts.